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Cricketers Clean Up

Blind cricketers have proved the big winners at the annual Blind Sports Awards.

Outstanding individual performances from Kevin Murray and James Dunn at the inaugural World Blind Cricket Cup in India late last year earned further recognition at the awards function in Auckland.

Australian-born Murray was adjudged Totally Blind Sportsperson of the Year for his bowling at the World Cup. The Christchurch cricketer and administrator was the best B1, or totally blind bowler, in any side at the tournament.

Dunn starred with the bat and ball and was rewarded with the Partially Sighted Sportsperson of the Year award. He hammered a century off just 74 balls and featured in an unbeaten stand of 323 with Brett Wilson against Sri Lanka.

Dunn also claimed five wickets during the series and was named the best B2, or partially sighted player, at the tournament.

Their efforts helped the New Zealand cricketers win the Team of the Year title. They would have had serious competition from the world champion sailors but their results were achieved after the qualifying period.

That has prompted Blind Sports officials to review June as the current expiry date each year.

Bowls picked up the four other awards.

National lawn bowling coach Vic Blance was Coach of the Year while long time indoor bowls enthusiast Alma Pye was adjudged Administrator of the Year for her work behind the scenes at the national championships in Timaru.

Iris Roberts fulfilled a similar role for indoor bowls in Otago and was voted Volunteer of the Year and to complete a big night for the code Rotorua's Janice Binnie won the Spirit of Sport Award for refusing to let medical problems keep her from playing indoor bowls.

ENDS....

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