News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Cornerstone Of Children's Television Back In 2000

What Now? the cornerstone of New Zealand children's television, will be back on TV2 in 2000 for its 18th year.

NZ On Air Chief Executive, Jo Tyndall, said What Now? remained the children's televison flagship.

"There is no doubting the programme's appeal or the commitment and talent of its team.

"What Now? is superb. It started out as a weekly half-hour show with pre-recorded competitions for chocolates and paperbacks, and has matured into a fully interactive programme, complete with website and interactive computer games.

"It's a programme for New Zealand children that reflects their country, their humour and their lives," said Ms Tyndall.

Ms Tyndall said a big part of the show's success is that it travels widely throughout the country, reflecting cultural and regional diversity.

"New Zealand may be a small country, but a child's life in Reefton is likely to be very different from a child's life in Kaitaia or in Auckland. This is exactly the sort of approach that makes the programme so popular with children all over the country," said Ms Tyndall.

What Now? Producer, Tony Palmer, said the programme received hundreds of requests to visit schools and communities from every part of New Zealand, and aimed to get as many of these places and people on television.

"What Now? is nearing its eighteenth birthday, and like all teenagers, it goes through phases, matures with age and continues to reinvent itself each year.

"I can assure viewers that next year the programme will deliver more fun and surprises, as the What Now? team strives to meet the needs and demands of New Zealand children," said Mr Palmer.

What Now? screens every weekday afternoon and every Sunday morning on TV2. NZ On Air has allocated $3,850,000 to TVNZ to produce 196 half-hour, and 40 two-hour episodes of What Now?

ENDS....

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Howard Davis Article: A Musical Axis - Brahms, Wagner, Sibelius

Brahms' warm and exquisitely subtle Symphony No. 3 in F major, Wagner's irrepressibly sentimental symphonic poem Siegfried Idyll, and Sibelius' chilling and immensely challenging Violin Concerto in D minor exemplify distinct stages of development in a tangled and convoluted series of skirmishes that came to define subsequent disputes about the nature of post-Romantic orchestral writing well into the following century. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: A Pale Ghost Writer

Reviewed by Ruth Brassington, Richard Flanagan's new novel is about a novelist hastily ghost-writing the biography of a crook about to go to trial. The reader is kept on a cliff-edge, as the narrator tries to get blood out of his stone man. More>>

Negotiations Begin: Equal Conditions For Men & Women In Professional Football

The trade union representing New Zealand's professional footballers has initiated bargaining for an agreement securing equal terms and conditions for men and women. If negotiated, it will be the first agreement of its kind in the world. More>>

ALSO:


New Zealand Wars Commemoration: Witi Ihimaera's Sleeps Standing Moetū

The second of several articles to mark Rā Maumahara, remembering the New Zealand Land Wars. The first was a Q&A with Vincent O’Malley, author of The Great War for New Zealand: Waikato 1800–2000. More>>

ALSO:


Howard Davis Review: Conflict & Resistance - Ria Hall's Rules of Engagement

From the aftermath of war through colonisation to her own personal convictions, Hall's new CD addresses current issues and social problems on multiple levels, confirming her position as a polemical and preeminent voice on the indigenous NZ music scene. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland