Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | News Flashes | Scoop Features | Scoop Video | Strange & Bizarre | Search

 


Islamic Council To Decide Bin Ladens Fate: Taliban

by Selwyn Manning

Afghanistan's ruling Taliba has announced this afternoon that a Grand Islamic Council involving 20 of the country's pre-eminent clerics will decide Osama bin Laden's fate.

Bin Laden is the "prime suspect" in last week's terror attacks in the United States.

Taliban-run Radio Shariat broadcast today that the Islamic council, or ulema, would meet to discuss and then decide the issue.

The Taliban's supreme leader Mullah Mohammed Omar, made the announcement after a Pakistani delegation, led by Lt-General Mahmood Ahmed, chief of the Pakistani Interservices Intelligence, met in Afghanistan to demand that bin Laden be handed to the coalition of nations.

Omar's address acknowledged the Pakistani delegation insisted: "we should try to prevent a US attack."

Pakistan's message was designed to be blunt: "Hand over bin Laden or be hit by a punishing retaliatory strike from a US-led international coalition."

The Islamic council will meet in Kabul within the next 24 hours.

Western news agencies are reporting that even if the Taliban hand over bin Laden, a war may not be averted.

The Taliban has given no indication whether it is willing to dismantle bin Laden's terrorist network, holed up in the northern regions of Afghanistan. Bin Laden's al-Qaida group operates from training camps in several Afghan provinces including eastern Nangarhar, Kunar, Paktia and Kandahar.

Meanwhile thousands of Afghani refugees have gathered at the borders of Iran and Pakistan. Pakistan virtually arrested the flow of people by halting the movement of all goods except for food and by keeping throngs of frightened Afghan refugees from entering Pakistan.

Within the lines of helpless and homeless people, are officials of the Taliban, reported to be leaving the country before an attack occurs.Both Pakistan and Iran has increased their respective military presence along the border lines.

The Taliban has closed Afghan's airspace to all international flights, forcing a reported 110 flights a day to take alternative paths over the continent.

This week, Pakistan has worked decisively to re-allign its diplomacy with that of the United States, a former Cold-War ally. This will likely cost Pakistan much if retaliatory strikes do rain down on Afghanistan. All hopes have been left with Pakistan to influence a solution to this crisis. This because Pakistan is one of only three counties to have recognised the Taliban as a legitimate government of the country.

Pakistan today promised "full cooperation" with the US should an assault on Afghanistan begin.

News agencies are reporting that hope has received a boost by Taliban leader Omar's radio announcement that the Islamic council, or ulema, would decide the issue.

Pakistan's delegation head, Lt-General Mahmood Ahmed is believed to have played a part in the creation in the mid-1990s of the Taliban, a devoutly Muslim religious militia that now rules about 95 percent of Afghanistan.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Werewolf: Living With Rio’s Olympic Ruins

Mariana Cavalcanti Critics of the Olympic project can point a discernible pattern in the delivery of Olympics-related urban interventions: the belated but rushed inaugurations of faulty and/or unfinished infrastructures... More>>

Live Blog On Now: Open Source//Open Society Conference

The second annual Open Source Open Society Conference is a 2 day event taking place on 22-23 August 2016 at Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington… Scoop is hosting a live blog summarising the key points of this exciting conference. More>>

ALSO:

Buildup:

Gordon Campbell: On The Politicising Of The War On Drugs In Sport

It hasn’t been much fun at all to see how “war on drugs in sport” has become a proxy version of the Cold War, fixated on Russia. This weekend’s banning of the Russian long jumper Darya Klishina took that fixation to fresh extremes. More>>

ALSO:

Binoy Kampmark: Kevin Rudd’s Failed UN Secretary General Bid

Few sights are sadder in international diplomacy than seeing an aging figure desperate for honours. In a desperate effort to net them, he scurries around, cultivating, prodding, wishing to be noted. Finally, such an honour is netted, in all likelihood just to shut that overly keen individual up. More>>

Open Source / Open Society: The Scoop Foundation - An Open Model For NZ Media

Access to accurate, relevant and timely information is a crucial aspect of an open and transparent society. However, in our digital society information is in a state of flux with every aspect of its creation, delivery and consumption undergoing profound redefinition... More>>

Keeping Out The Vote: Gordon Campbell On The US Elections

I’ll focus here on just two ways that dis-enfranchisement is currently occurring in the US: (a) by the rigging of the boundary lines for voter districts and (b) by demanding elaborate photo IDs before people are allowed to cast their vote. More>>

Ramzy Baroud: Being Black Palestinian - Solidarity As A Welcome Pathology

It should come as no surprise that the loudest international solidarity that accompanied the continued spate of the killing of Black Americans comes from Palestine; that books have already been written and published by Palestinians about the plight of their Black brethren. In fact, that solidarity is mutual. More>>

ALSO:


Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news