Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

Scoop Images: Auckland Peace March Take Two

Photos and story by Chloe Heffernan
Aotearoa Indymedia - AIM

Two weeks after the last peace march (See… Scoop Images: March Against US War And Peace Vigil) Aucklanders took to the streets on Saturday again to protest against the US and British military strikes against Afghanistan.

Lots of new faces showed up to this action as the peace movement broadens out including religious groups, women's groups, the Princes Street branch of the Labour Party and many members of the Auckland Muslim Community.

Members of the Muslim community led the march with chants in Arabic which was joined by around 600 people.

Two children from an Afghan family held placards saying "What's the difference between you and Osama?" and "Don't kill my mum: I need her " as their mother is still in Afghanistan.




Green MP Keith Locke spoke at the rally before the march and participated in full. Locke was very critical of the government's decision to support the so-called "war on terrorism" by sending SAS troops.

People signed a giant banner against the war and a petition was also passed around. The March took in the US and British Consulate then proceeded up Queen Street to Albert Park where people sat in the sun to listen to further speakers.

Matt McCarten, President of the Alliance, talked "straight" about the "fight within the party" over the actions of the Alliance caucus supporting the Labour Party's stance. He said the Alliance party branches are clear in their condemnation of the war and see it as an imperialist act. Apparently the party executive are to meet tomorrow to have an "interesting discussion" as to whether their support for the government is in line with Alliance policy requiring UN endorsement. Maybe a change in stance is in the works?


Maire Leadbeater


Placard


Placard (2)


Relaxing In Albert Park


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Resignation Of Metiria Turei: Were Journalists 'just Doing Their Job'?

In our research we examined the role of journalism in animating the Turei controversy and the different perceptions of professional journalists and online commentators sympathetic to Turei’s left politics. ... More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Extradition Of Julian Assange

It isn’t necessary to like Julian Assange to think that his extradition to the US (on the charge of aiding and abetting Chelsea Manning) would be a major injustice... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: Islamic State Meets The Searchers

The histories of the European children forcibly recruited into Native American tribal life during the 19th century do remind us of just how difficult the social re-integration of the children of ISIS is likely to be. More>>

Joseph Cederwall: CJR Analysis Of Post-Christchurch Media Coverage

After the Christchurch massacre, Columbia Journalism Review analysed news sources to see how outlets complied with guidelines from groups that seek to limit the amplification of terrorist acts through media. More>>

News Deserts: The Death March Of Local Journalism

Joseph Cederwall: The corporate media sector seems unable to do anything to halt the raging dumpster fire of consolidation, layoffs and centralisation of content production. All this means we are increasingly seeing ‘news deserts’ appearing in local communities. Illustration by Paul Sahre. More>>

ALSO: