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Translation Of Newsweek Article On Bush Nazi Ties

NOTE: The following is a translation of the Polish Newsweek article linked to by Scoop last week. A big thankyou to Scoop readers Luke and Mateusz for providing the translations. – The Scoop Editor

Translation from the Polish of the Newsweek article on Prescott Bush and the Nazis

"The Bush family reaped rewards from the forced labour prisoners in the Auschwitz concentration camp. Prescott Bush, the grandfather of the US president George W bush, during WW2 had financial links with the nazis, thanks to whom he made his fortune as a banker.

Prescott Bush was a director and shareholder of the United Banking Corporation, which acquired from the nazi industrialist Fritz Thyssen, the Consolidate Silesian Steel Corporation, where prisoners from Auschwitz worked.

During the summer in 1942, this was reported in the American press and the US government examined the books of UBC. On the 20th of October, the government commenced action against the company under the trading with the enemy act (sic) which Franklin D. Roosevelt enacted a week after the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941.

The company could continue to function under the limitations that it’s functions would not result in any help being given to the Nazis. Only in 1943, Prescott Bush distanced himself from UBC and had even engaged in the collection of funds for the victims of the war inhis role as president of the National War Fund."

Another translation has been provided by Scoop reader Mateusz.

"The Bush family made a profit from the Auschwitz prisoners’ slave labour. Prescott Sheldon Bush, ‘Dubya’s’ grandfather, had tight financial connections with the Nazis, thanks to which he multiplied the family’s fortune as a banker.

Prescott Bush was an executive and shareholder of the United Banking Corporation, which bought the Consolidated Silesian Steel Corporation from the Nazi industrialist Fritz Thyssen, who had been employing prisoners from nearby Auschwitz.

In the summer of 1942, the case was made public by the American press, which lead to the investigation of the financial records of UBC by the government.

On the 20th of October that year the authorities took over the company’s shares on the basis of an enemy trade act, which President Franklin D. Roosevelt had signed one week after the attack on Pearl Harbour in December 1941.

The corporation could still operate, but only if its actions would not in any way benefit the Nazis. Prescott Bush pulled out of the UBC as late as 1943 and for a period of time committed himself to fundraising for the casualties of war as CEO of the National War Fund. "

To view the original see…
http://newsweek.redakcja.pl/archiwum/artykul.asp?Watek=7159&WatekStr=1&Artykul=4903

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