Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | News Flashes | Scoop Features | Scoop Video | Strange & Bizarre | Search

 


SIS Gets Two Hours Parliamentary Scrutiny A Year

SIS Gets Two Hours Scrutiny A Year


by Kevin List


SIS Director Richard Woods And Prime Minister Helen Clark
Who Is Watching The Watchers?

Answers to a parliamentary question from Green MP, Keith Locke, reveal New Zealand's Security Intelligence Services received less than two hours scrutiny in the last year.

Since June 2003 when the committee looked into security matters for the grand total of twenty minutes, the Intelligence and Security Committee has met twice – on 16th December for 49 minutes, and most recently on 15th June again for 49 minutes.

Minus the odd spot of chit chat, general pleasantries and biscuit dunking these figures reveal that the members (at present – Helen Clark, Michael Cullen, Jim Anderton, Don Brash and Winston Peters) have barely spent an hour and a half looking into the implications of :

- the Refugee Status Appeal Authorities criticism of the Security Intelligence Services regarding the Ahmed Zaoui case;

- the possibly illegal seven hour questioning of Mr Zaoui, in early December 2002, without recourse to a lawyer by the Police and Security Intelligence Services, brought to light in early December 2003;

- the resignation of the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, Laurie Greig, following the High Court decision that prevented Mr Greig from having anything further to do with the Zaoui case for his (Mr Greig's) 'apparent bias';

- &, the stolen passport case involving a number of Israeli citizens - some of whom had connections to Israeli Government agencies.

Also worth noting is the fact that since September 11 2001 and the attacks on America, intelligence agencies, including New Zealand's Security Intelligence Service, have received large increases in funding.

So whilst New Zealand's intelligence agencies have received this extra funding it appears no additional parliamentary scrutiny has gone into checking how these organisations are performing using their extra resources.

SOURCE:
Written Question 11189 (2004) Published - Prime Minister - Normal Reply

Question: On how many occasions has the Intelligence and Security Committee met since 27 July 2002, and for each meeting, what date was it held on and how long did it last?

Portfolio: Prime Minister -Minister: Rt Hon Helen Clark

Answer: Since 27 July 2002 the Intelligence and Security Committee has met five times. It met on 17 December 2002 for 49 minutes, 19 March 2003 for 44 minutes, 10 June 2003 for 20 minutes, 16 December 2003 for 49 minutes and 15 June 2004 for 49 minutes.

LINKS FOR FURTHER BACKGROUND:

A Second Look At The Intelligence and Security Committee
By Kevin List
http://www.scoop.co.nz/mason/stories/HL0404/S00081.htm

Should Greig Go To Ensure SIS Is Put Back On Its Toes?
By Selwyn Manning
http://www.scoop.co.nz/mason/stories/HL0403/S00318.htm

*** ENDS ***

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Werewolf: Living With Rio’s Olympic Ruins

Mariana Cavalcanti Critics of the Olympic project can point a discernible pattern in the delivery of Olympics-related urban interventions: the belated but rushed inaugurations of faulty and/or unfinished infrastructures... More>>

Live Blog On Now: Open Source//Open Society Conference

The second annual Open Source Open Society Conference is a 2 day event taking place on 22-23 August 2016 at Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington… Scoop is hosting a live blog summarising the key points of this exciting conference. More>>

ALSO:

Buildup:

Gordon Campbell: On The Politicising Of The War On Drugs In Sport

It hasn’t been much fun at all to see how “war on drugs in sport” has become a proxy version of the Cold War, fixated on Russia. This weekend’s banning of the Russian long jumper Darya Klishina took that fixation to fresh extremes. More>>

ALSO:

Binoy Kampmark: Kevin Rudd’s Failed UN Secretary General Bid

Few sights are sadder in international diplomacy than seeing an aging figure desperate for honours. In a desperate effort to net them, he scurries around, cultivating, prodding, wishing to be noted. Finally, such an honour is netted, in all likelihood just to shut that overly keen individual up. More>>

Open Source / Open Society: The Scoop Foundation - An Open Model For NZ Media

Access to accurate, relevant and timely information is a crucial aspect of an open and transparent society. However, in our digital society information is in a state of flux with every aspect of its creation, delivery and consumption undergoing profound redefinition... More>>

Keeping Out The Vote: Gordon Campbell On The US Elections

I’ll focus here on just two ways that dis-enfranchisement is currently occurring in the US: (a) by the rigging of the boundary lines for voter districts and (b) by demanding elaborate photo IDs before people are allowed to cast their vote. More>>

Ramzy Baroud: Being Black Palestinian - Solidarity As A Welcome Pathology

It should come as no surprise that the loudest international solidarity that accompanied the continued spate of the killing of Black Americans comes from Palestine; that books have already been written and published by Palestinians about the plight of their Black brethren. In fact, that solidarity is mutual. More>>

ALSO:


Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news