Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

Book Review: Grow Rich with the Property Cycle

Book Review: Grow Rich with the Property Cycle,
by Kieran Trass, $29.95

When Is The Right Time To Invest In Property?


Reviewed by Vicky Powell, Good Returns

You’ve finally found that dream house with the enviable sunny deck and expansive, landscaped garden. This is the perfect home that you’ve been tirelessly searching for weekend after weekend. But you’ve heard all the reports about the upcoming property slump, so is now a good time to invest in property?

It’s never been easy predicting the property market, but now according to Kieran Trass author of Grow Rich with the Property Cycle, you can discover if there is an optimum time to buy property or optimum times to use specific property investment strategies.

If you’re looking for secrets to ‘get-rich-quick’ in the property market, this isn’t the book for you. “The smartest property investors understand that property investment is not a get-rich scheme but rather a grow-rich strategy” says Trass, who has over 20 years experience in the finance industry and over ten years analysing property investors’ portfolios.



Luckily it’s not rocket science, and Trass has done all the research for you. He breaks the property cycle down to three major stages; boom, slump and recovery and includes graphs and tables to illustrate his points.

The book itself is divided into four easy to read sections.

The first provides an overview of the main factors that drive the property cycle and describes the emotions of fear and greed that occur throughout the cycle. You will learn why the property cycle is so predictable, and how to read the property cycle clock so you can follow the progress of your local property market.

The second section looks at the three stages of the property cycle (boom, slump and recovery) and outlines the clues provided during each stage by the media, as well as investors’ likely reactions during each phase of the cycle based on their fear and greed. He also includes some good tips for what wise investors would be doing at each stage.

Section three shows how you can secure your financial health regardless of the impacts of the various phases of the property cycle and answers the age-old question, ‘When is it a good time to buy property?’

Section four explains the critical finance cycles, which are implicitly linked to the real estate cycle, and also considers whether the property cycle is now an obsolete concept.

So, stop procrastinating, grab a copy of this book and plan the best time to make that dream home a reality.

To buy your copy of ‘Grow Rich with the Property Cycle’ priced at $29.95 incl. GST from the Good Returns Bookstore click here.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Resignation Of Metiria Turei: Were Journalists 'just Doing Their Job'?

In our research we examined the role of journalism in animating the Turei controversy and the different perceptions of professional journalists and online commentators sympathetic to Turei’s left politics. ... More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Extradition Of Julian Assange

It isn’t necessary to like Julian Assange to think that his extradition to the US (on the charge of aiding and abetting Chelsea Manning) would be a major injustice... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: Islamic State Meets The Searchers

The histories of the European children forcibly recruited into Native American tribal life during the 19th century do remind us of just how difficult the social re-integration of the children of ISIS is likely to be. More>>

Joseph Cederwall: CJR Analysis Of Post-Christchurch Media Coverage

After the Christchurch massacre, Columbia Journalism Review analysed news sources to see how outlets complied with guidelines from groups that seek to limit the amplification of terrorist acts through media. More>>

News Deserts: The Death March Of Local Journalism

Joseph Cederwall: The corporate media sector seems unable to do anything to halt the raging dumpster fire of consolidation, layoffs and centralisation of content production. All this means we are increasingly seeing ‘news deserts’ appearing in local communities. Illustration by Paul Sahre. More>>

ALSO: