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Weaver - Terrorist Posada *Is* U.S. Policy

Weaver: Terrorist Posada *Is* U.S. Policy


June 25, 2005
Gary Webb - Presente
Please Distribute Widely

Writing from El Paso, Texas, near the holding cell where international terrorist Luis Posada Carriles awaits a (now delayed) bail hearing, Bill Weaver writes, documenting every awe-striking statement he makes with links to the source material:

"George Bush, Dick Cheney, Don Rumsfeld and high level staff from various agencies sat around the large oval mahogany table, a gift from Richard Nixon to the United States, in the Cabinet Room of the White House. They were assessing the recent crises and the effectiveness of the intelligence community and the problems of a prying Congress, civil libertarians, and bad publicity. They especially lamented how outdated legal strictures were impeding the execution of policy. One complained that people do 'not understand that intelligence problems must be treated in a special category,' and that present exigent circumstances require relaxing legal standards, for '[i]t has always been the case in history where vital interests are involved,' that the president has the power to take whatever action is necessary to safeguard the country. It is noted, as it has been many times since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, that 'Lincoln suspended certain rights [and] we have had emergency laws... There are many examples.' Speaking of civil liberties, Bush said '[w]e have gone too far at this business' and Secretary Rumsfeld agreed 'entirely with all that has been said' and griped that because of an overly deferent attitude toward civil liberties '[w]e are being forced to give up sensitive information in order to prosecute” terrorists.'

"Despite the subject matter and the people involved, this discussion was not a recent one; it occurred on January 13, 1977, during the last National Security Council meeting of President Gerald Ford’s administration. The same players as almost thirty years ago, with the addition of George Junior, are still at it..."

"A few miles away from where this is being written, Luis Posada sits in an immigration detention center. He is the living embodiment of a fifty-year-old misguided policy that was and is willing to sacrifice the innocent for an ideology. Posada’s career is the career of sordid U.S. policy in Latin America, and he is a reminder that the excuses for aggression may change, but the underlying motivations remain the same. Posada was not a renegade or a convenient partner for U.S. policy; he was U.S policy.

"...here in the U.S., in holding Posada captive, we are holding ourselves captive, we are pressed to face the truth of our past."

Read the whole thing, with ample links that document all that Weaver is saying, via The Narcosphere:

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/story/2005/6/25/201416/689

From somewhere in a country called América,

Al Giordano
Correspondent
The Narco News Bulletin
http://www.narconews.com

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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