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Kamala Sarup: Nepal Is Proud For Its Beauty

Nepal Is Proud For Its Beauty


By Kamala Sarup

Nepal carries long history of civilization, culture, tradition, politics and heritage. Nepal has close ties with both of its neighbours, India and China. Nepal is commonly divided into three physiographic areas: the Mountain, Hill, and Terai Regions. These ecological belts run east-west and are bisected by Nepal's major river systems.

Nepal is beautiful and an Independent country. Nepal has certain geographic and natural attractions. Tourists come to Nepal for trekking. Almost all the trekking areas are en route the rural villages, which are benefiting the locals. Nepal is a unique destination for tourists because of the warmth, affection and friendliness of Nepalese people. In Nepal tourism can intervene to provide better opportunities, empowerment of poor at local level.

Nepal producing tourism. How best the energy and produce more and better (higher value and value-added) tourism business is the key to running a successful Nepal.

Nepalese know, economic power is much more important in this time.

Nepal, is also developing a mutually reinforcing agricultural and tourist industries. Almost always, there is more money to be made but, hostilities are usually bad for business, so everyone has a stake in seeing a good peace established.

Nepal is continue to remain a popular adventure and nature-based tourist destination even in the days to come. What can a nation, such as Nepal, learn from all this?

Perhaps the following:

1. Local conditions and the cultural background of each nation must be taken into account. There is, perhaps, no "one size fits all" Nation and development model.

2. In creating and fostering a peace, development, a nation must also allow the ingredients which "grow" and nurture democracies: literacy, and education. I would also add women's rights as a necessary to any successful nation in the 21st Century.

3. The process of a development is a process. People must be prepared for setbacks in the development experiment and not yield to the temptation for a "quick fix".

4. It is most difficult to exercise people's rights when the basic security affecting life and limb is lacking due to war and revolution.

5. If the education is available, people will find the way to make it useful to them and, in the process, create the conditions favorable to a development suited to their needs.

Nepal's Proud Histroy

1.Indo-Aryan tribes entered the valley around 1500 BCE. Around 1000 BCE, small kingdoms and confederations of clans arose. One of the princes of the Shakya confederation was Siddharta Gautama (563–483 BCE), who renounced his royalty to lead an ascetic life and came to be known as the Buddha ("the one who has awakened").

By 250 BCE, the region came under the influence of the Mauryan empire of northern India, and later became a puppet state under the Gupta Dynasty in the 4th century CE. From the late 5th century CE, rulers called the Licchavis governed the area. The Licchavi dynasty went into decline in the late 8th century and was followed by a Newari era, from 879, although the extent of their control over the entire country is uncertain. By late 11th century, southern Nepal came under the influence of the Chalukaya Empire of southern India. Under the Chalukayas, Nepal's religious establishment changed as the kings patronised Hinduism instead of the prevailing Buddhism.

In 1765 the Gorkha ruler Prithvi Narayan Shah set out to unify the kingdoms, after first seeking arms and aid from India and buying the neutrality of bordering Indian kingdoms. After several bloody battles and sieges, he managed to unify Nepal three years later. This marked the birth of the modern nation of Nepal. A dispute and subsequent war with Tibet over control of mountain passes forced Nepal to retreat and pay heavy repatriations. Rivalry with the British East India Company over the annexation of minor states bordering Nepal eventually led to the brief but bloody Anglo-Nepalese War (1815–16), in which Nepal defended its present day borders but lost its territories west of the Kali River, including present day Uttaranchal state and several Punjab Hill States of present day Himachal Pradesh. The Treaty of Sugauli also ceded parts of the Terai and Sikkim to the Company in exchange for Nepalese autonomy. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nepal)

Nepal's War with British

The British launched their attack on the Nepali forces at Nalapani, the western most point of Nepal's frontier at the close of 1814. Though the Nepalese were able to inflict heavy losses to the British army on various fronts, the larger army and the superior weapons of the British proved too strong. The Nepali army evacuated the areas west of the Mahakali river and ultimately the treaty of Sugauli was signed with the British in 1816. Among other things, this treaty took away a large chunk of the Terai from Nepal and the rivers Mahakali and Mechi were fixed as the country's western and eastern boundaries. (Source: http://www.thamel.com/htms/history.htm)

2. Gurkhas fought against the British army in the Nepal wars of the early 19th century, during which a mutual respect and admiration developed between the two sides. The British, very much impressed by the extraordinary bravery and fighting skills of the Gurkhas, started to enlist them into their military ranks after a peace deal signed in 1815, and this unusual symbiosis has lasted ever since. It is estimated that the British brigade of Gurkhas is the fourth largest foreign currency earner for Nepal's economy. (Source:bosnianepalbritainmilitary)

Nepal has her many international friends.

Nepal, with its deep spiritual roots.

*************

A Nepali Journalist and Story Writer Kamala Sarup is an editor of peacejournalism.com. Some of the main focus of the e-magazine have been on disarmament, conflict resolution, nonviolent sanctions, conflicts and crises. Its activities include training,research and supports peace, democracy and development in societies undergoing crisis and change. Kamala Sarup is specialising in in-depth reporting and writing on Peace Resolutions, Anti war, Women, Terrorism, Anti Fascism, Democracy, and Development.

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