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Clash of Super Powers in an Age of Global Conflict

Clash of the Super Powers in an Age of Global Conflict


by Mark Rais

Three powers now flex for rule in our modern world. The world has not experienced this type of struggle since the 1930s, when unyielding socio-political ideologies spawned by ambitious leaders began to drive daily events.

The danger of this rising struggle is that it will forcibly engage nations and people in a power game that may be neither favourable, nor resolvable.

To identify the primary players, it is essential to correlate current military engagements with the changes in social and economic climate, and specific actions of nations that influence this climate. It is also imperative to understand that the rise of the new super powers is directly an outcome of the policies and monetary tactics of world leaders.

Three Powers Flexing for Dominion

The most evident power of the world is in control of monetary systems and major global institutions. This is the Western Power system. Many of its nations now experience political, social, and economic turmoil as new powers exert greater influence. Western nations also face increasing instability as a result of their leaders’ ineffectual reactions to this drain of power. Some leaders now forgo long term stabilising strategies to instead focus on short term empowerment. This inevitably accelerates the overall decline.

The second power is the rising force that drives the growth and development of many Muslim nations. Bear in mind that this is not directly related to Muslims and their practice of faith. It is more a manifestation of individual leaders who use this as a tool for power. They are rapidly gaining influence through out the world, and forming new systems based on distinct culture and ideology. An ideology may well be diametrically opposed to the other existing ideologies.

The third power is the rising force in Asia. Unique in that it is both a natural power progression derived from sheer numeric dominance, and diverse in its cultural attributes, with leaders in China, India, and Russia as its primary players.

Witness the events such as the military research partnership between Russia and India, and military training between India and China. Also noteworthy is the new political cooperation at the Security Council level between Russian and China. Moreover, this is evident in recent collaboration at the world trade level between India and China.

This third super power is a loosely connected hegemony. Its rise parallels the degeneration of Western influence and the clash of cultures with the rising Muslim power.

Similar to past super powers, the Western, Muslim, and Asian power forces embody the characteristics of multi-national cooperation, and substantive political and military influence.

Most poignantly, all three powers are led by people intent to gain or retain maximum influence over world systems.

Paradigm Shift

Where one major influencing power has tightly controlled most of the world’s systems, today there are many active fulcrums of change. The clashes that are occurring not only manifest themselves in military and militant methods, but also play out in the arena of international law and trade.

This collision of culture and belief systems is affecting every level of society. Extremism and military endeavours are only a part of this expansive conflict.

Where once Western thought and culture dominated, today we find increasingly that this is no longer defacto.

For instance, health curative solutions stemming from ideology and practices of Western medicine and economics are increasingly in discord with the newly popular methods that find their heritage in Asian culture and medicinal practices (pharmacology vs. homeopathy and herbology).

An area of particular interest is with monetary controls, which have been under the influence of Western leaders for generations. Today, the monetary controls are now sifting into the hands of new leaders of rising powers who have distinctly different methodologies and goals.

One such example is seen with regard to Iran. The nation of Iran, having created a method to circumvent existing structures through the new oil Bourse, now trades in a fourth oil market. This market is uniquely in the hands of non-western powers.

Many events occurring in the world, both subtly (food price deviations) and overtly (terrorism and military actions), are the beginnings of a global conflict for supremacy.

One validation of this is the tactic some leaders are taking to liquidate assets, move funds, and shift monetary wealth for themselves. This is often the self preservation hoarding response to a recognised failure of power retention.

It is reasonable to conclude that this is no minor skirmish occurring in distant lands, nor a short term event. It is a confrontation occurring at many levels in most nations. What we hear about in the news are the visible manifestations of a far more subtle and expansive conflict.

It is essential that nations like New Zealand take a pragmatic approach, to avoid serving in this escalating battle as expendable pawns.

essential that nations like New Zealand take a pragmatic approach,
to avoid serving in this escalating battle as expendable pawns.

Winner Takes All

The world is now beginning to see a drawn out multi-tiered confrontation between the leaders of three super powers. These powers are not singular nations, but conglomerations with comparable ideologies and like adversaries.

In this unique situation, the most effective means for ensuring influence and power is through cohesion.

Wherever powers correlate their endeavours, there you will find substantive dominance. A few short years ago, the Western leaders had a remarkable opening to develop this cohesion. Through a series of tactics, this opportunity evaporated and antagonisms intensified with the other super powers.

Too many leaders continue to view the world in the context of the past century, rather than the reality of the 21st century.

The most important factor in surviving in this new world power struggle is to ensure there is a reformation of thinking. This is not a theoretical struggle between cultures and ideologies; it is a pragmatic one that will affect future generations.

Unfortunately, many leaders remain peculiarly oblivious to the magnitude of this conflict, the multiple levels in which it is operates, and the potential it has to divide and destroy nations.

Leaders in government will determine, through their decisions, whether New Zealand is well positioned to remain neutral. Missteps may irreversibly lead the country into the susceptible position of pawn in this growing conflict.

Other Scoop articles by Mark Rais:
Op Article: Oil Rules the World

Op Article: War for the Hearts & Minds of Our Children

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Mark Rais is a writer for the technology and science industry. He serves as a senior editor for an on-line magazine and has written numerous articles on the influence of technology and society.

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