Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | News Flashes | Scoop Features | Scoop Video | Strange & Bizarre | Search

 


The Royal New Zealand Ballet Visits Wellington

25 February 2011

The Royal New Zealand Ballet Visits Wellington

On Thursday evening, the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s TOWER Tutus on Tour delighted a large and enthusiastic audience at the Wellington Opera House as part of their six-week national tour.

The TOWER Tutus on Tour is divided into two distinct acts. The first half of the show, entitled Verdi Variations, is a collection of classical ballet pieces—solos, duets, and ensembles. The dancers stunned the audience with exceptional strength, poise, and grace. Each performance seemed to ooze seamlessly into the next, as each dancer seemed to welcome and celebrate the extraordinary talent of the other company members.

The second part of the show, though less technically impressive, distinguished itself in its theatrical nature. Adorned in designer Julian Southgate’s wonderfully impressive costumes, members of the RNZB performed their own rendition of the classic Pinocchio. Southgate attributes his inspiration for the beautiful and eccentric attire to the “colour and exaggeration of street theatre of the [early 19th century] , and the gaudy way that travelling companies shaped the lavish opera costumes and conceits of the century.” Tellingly, his creations evoked this time period flawlessly, as the audience sat enraptured by whirling flashes of energetic colours and outrageous patterns.

The members of the company contributed equally to Pinocchio’s success, not only in their striking dance numbers, but also in their impressive theatrics. Geppetto, the old craftsman, Pinocchio, the benevolent but foolish marionette, the Blue Fairy, the wily Fox, the cat, and a number of other characters displayed a level of acting ability uncommon to most dancers.

It was truly a lovely evening for both ballet and theatre in Wellington.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Trump And The Madman Theory

Years ago, Richard Nixon explained to his chief adviser Bob Haldeman what has since become known as the “Madman Theory” of foreign policy. Basically, if America’s rivals could be reminded that Nixon was an unstable, rabid anti-Communist with his finger on the nuclear trigger, Nixon reasoned, then maybe they’d be less willing to challenge the US in the world’s hot spots… More>>

Australia And The South China Sea: Another Foreign Policy Blunder Looming

James O’Neill: The overblown rhetoric from the United States has led at least one commentator to describe so-called ‘analyses’ of the South China Sea situation as “the biggest load of analytical rubbish about South East Asia to emerge since the CIA mistook bee feces for a Soviet-supplied biological weapon in 1981.” More>>

People's Candidates: A Peaceful Political Revolution Begins In France

Alastair Thompson profiles Philippe Mazuel one of 86 largely unknown political contenders who stepped up to become the "People's Candidate" for France's 2017 Presidential election. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Whether Donald Trump Has Peaked

Perhaps come August, when the Republicans will finally get to anoint their candidate at their convention in Cleveland, Trump’s fortunes will have waned and the delegate count will be sufficiently deadlocked as to create a ‘contested convention’ whereby the party might then be able to turn to a different, dark horse candidate… Dream on. More>>

ALSO:

Max Rashbrooke At 'Future Of Work' Conference: Labour: Lions Or Pussycats?

So far the debate generated by Labour’s conference has been about the universal basic income (UBI), a guaranteed annual payment to every adult regardless of status. It’s probably the big new idea in this field and has proponents across the political spectrum. But Labour won’t actually go there soon ... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news