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ACT Website Policy Pages: Bacon Goes With Everything!

ACT Website Policy Pages: Bacon Goes With Everything!

ACT party policy
pages, meat, bacon ipsum
Click for big version.

An unfinished ACT election policy section has been published on their website. Instead of policy descriptions, http://www.act.org.nz/policies, and pages with headings like Tertiary Education and Welfare, were filled with a mixture of latin words and name of kinds of meat:

Bacon ipsum dolor sit amet esse anim dolore, in labore short loin andouille tri-tip aliquip shoulder ut shank. T-bone shank corned beef ullamco id, in bresaola chuck non strip steak nisi boudin pastrami. Ground round ribeye pork chop, eiusmod et short loin irure dolor exercitation beef ribs prosciutto ham hock cow cillum tongue...

ACT party policy
pages, meat, bacon ipsum
Click for big version.

The policy section is not linked to from the ACT website's front page but was live, coming up in a Google search for "ACT policies" and noted by a commenter at The Standard.

The nonsense latin passage beginning "Lorem ipsum..." is traditionally used as a placeholder in designs when the final text is not yet available. Recently website have begun offering variations on 'greeking text' such as Hipster Ipsum, Bogan Ipsum and the one used here: Bacon Ipsum.

Newstalk ZB's Felix Marwick reports on twitter that ACT's Leader and Deputy Leader were told about the website problem two days ago.

As this story was being written the placeholder text was being removed and replaced with policy statements.

ACT party policy
pages, meat, bacon ipsum, cleanup
Click for big version.

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