Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | News Flashes | Scoop Features | Scoop Video | Strange & Bizarre | Search

 


Family Court Reform Proceeds

Family Court reforms will either make it easier to resolve disputes or make dispute resolution too expensive to access, depending on which political party you listen to.

Associate Justice Minister Chester Borrows said in the first reading of the Family Court Proceedings Reform Bill that the bill would modernise the Family Courts and make them more accessible.

Borrows said the bill was the biggest changes to the court since they were set up in 1981 and they addressed wide spread concern the Family Court was not able to focus on the most serious cases, while costs had escalated despite the level of work remaining constant.

The changes would ensure there was more support for people to resolve disputes out of court and before proceedings begin, Borrows said.


Charles Chauvel said he had some real problems with the legislation and these had been well laid out by groups such as the family court section of the Law Society.

While there was much that was laudable about the families dispute resolution service, there was a fee to get through the door which would make it unaffordable for many.

The fact a fee had to be paid before accessing the service, which had to be gone through before any court proceedings could begin, would mean vulnerable people would be deterred from using the Family Court.

Former justice minister Phil Goff said it appeared the bill’s main purpose was to cut costs.

The bill was sent to the Justice and Electoral Committee for consideration by 68 to 52 with National, NZ First, ACT and United Future supporting.

Earlier the Callaghan Innovation Bill (formerly the Advanced Technology Institute Bill) passed its first reading by 105 to 15 with the Greens and Mana opposed.

The Greens and Mana also opposed the Appropriation (2011/12 Financial Review) Bill.

This somewhat surprised Speaker Lockwood Smith who pointed out it was a procedural motion taken without debate to allow MPs to debate the financial reviews of Crown entities at a later date, despite this the Greens insisted their opposition to the move be recorded.

**
ParliamentToday.co.nz is a breaking news source for New Zealand parliamentary business featuring broadcast daily news reports.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Ethics Of Publishing The Trump Dossier

The controversy over the dossier purporting to show US President-elect Donald Trump’s alleged ties with Russia has been virtually overshadowed by the related controversy over whether the Buzzfeed site should have published the dossier in the first place... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell:
On Meryl Streep’s Speech

Primarily, Meryl Streep’s critical speech at the Golden Globes – which is the award ceremony hosted by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association – was a defence of journalism and of journalists... More>>

New HiveMind Project: What Should We Do About Sugar?

While most people agree that increased sugar consumption is a major cause of too many New Zealanders being overweight and obese, what we should do about this remains a matter of debate and argument. More>>

ALSO:


Gordon Campbell: On Vladimir Putin’s Wonderful, Fabulous, Very Good Year

Safe to say that no-one, but no-one has had a better 2016 than Vladimir Putin. What an annus mirabilis it has been for him. Somehow, Russia got away with directly interfering in the US election process, such that a friendly oligarch is about to take up residence in the White House, rather than a genuine rival. More>>

ALSO:


Gordon Campbell: On The Media Normalisation Of Trump

We all supposedly agree that the media is going to hell in a tabloid handbasket, but the trends to the contrary can be a bit harder to spot. In his 1970s book The Right Stuff, Tom Wolfe had mocked the way the media instinctively acts as what he called The Victorian Gentleman. More>>

ALSO:

Binoy Kampmark: The Reality Of Fake News

Fake news as reality; the inability to navigate the waters in which it swims; a weakness in succumbing to material best treated with a huge pinch of salt. That, we are told, is the new condition of the global information environment. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news