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Women, Movies and Manisha Koirala

Women, Movies and Manisha Koirala

by Kamala Sarup
December 4, 2012

When I first watched "Bombay" and "Khamoshi", a Hindi musical film in which Manisha Koirala played, it touched my heart so that tears fell from my eyes and I stopped breathing. Since than, I became a great fan of her talent and watched all her performances. I would like to compare her with great American actors like Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, and Julia Roberts, and Indian actors, Mina Kumari, Nargis and Hema Malini. Manisha is a world-class beauty and a world-class talent

Watching Elizabeth Taylor and Manisha in movies as a way to improve my understanding on women's power, arts, beauty and performance so that I can appreciate its vast literature in the original language. Currently I have been watching some movies like "The Taming of the Shrew (1967) by Elizabeth Taylor and 1942 a love story by Manisha Koirala. They created a beautiful classical world in an easy style and all interesting and beautiful.

I also watched some Spanish movies, named "Like Water for Chocolate" and "All About My Mother", and also an American movie "Father of the Bride 1950" by Elizabeth Taylor and Agni Sakshi (1996) played by Manisha Koirala; very powerful movies. These movies are beautiful.

Recently, watching about various foreign-language movies and emphasis here is on comparing structures, acting, direction, etc. Watching English and American, Germany, French, Indian and Nepali movies gave me an education on women's empowerment. As a woman, I am learning the arts and more interested in learning about a variety of subjects on women, how women played and act. The reason it is requires is that it enhances quantitative women's talent. I think that we are taking an interest in many things to broaden our perspective on what is going on in women-centric movies and what has gone on in the movie's world that we can write about to clarify our own thinking, viz., the women's talent.

We may never act in movies in our life, but good actors will touch our heart functions, throughout our lives. This is the reason, I believe, that we should have some understanding of movies, their beauty and the role given to women, which we will see often, whatever our career, even though we don't become directors or actors.

Some actors don't seem to be concerned about good performance in good films. Becoming a good actor is not easy. My teacher recently said "First, actors have to be on time for work, need to get a good practice on their role so that they will be alert during filming. Actors should not fall behind. If new actors want to be success and struggling, then they should seek immediate help. If possible, every actor needs to do a light pre-practicing of the acting, that will assist them understanding."

He further said, "I really think any actors miss good acting for reasons beyond their control, then they will have to get help from schools or directors. Again, actors should not have gaps in their knowledge. Some of the women actors like Elizabeth Taylor, Mina Kumari and Manisha Koirala are ahead of the game. The only way actors learn anything is with good performance. You stop practicing acting and you stop learning. It's as simple as that". I agree with my teacher.

Most movies in the US are made with good directors, actors, locations, and stories. The films provides superior locations like rivers, which prevails in most places. I think woman-centric movies are more popular when movies are extremely high and are still played by good actors who need to keep standards up. The good movies are more fastened together at the time. Movie-making is a fascinating and complex subject where directors and actors are played to design them. Becoming an actor like Manisha has advantages. As a person "on the winning path" she did well in all movies where conformity to its culture is expected.

Now, I just heard about Manisha's sickness; my sadness continues. I can only hope for her speedy recovery from her illness and will return in the cinema's world soon to entertain us again with her beautiful performances. I know, actor Manisha will be recover each day and continue her acting. The fact that we live in a beautiful world and lots of prayers for a beautiful actor, Manisha Koirala.

*************

Kamala Sarup is an editor for www.mediaforfreedom.com. Kamala Sarup was a regular contributor to UPI- Asia News. Kamala specialties are in depth reporting and writing stories on peace and anti-war issues, philosophy, literature, Human Rights, women, Anti terrorism, democracy and development. She has also written two collections of stories.

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