Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | News Flashes | Scoop Features | Scoop Video | Strange & Bizarre | Search

 


Say No To Asset Sales - National Rally - 13 Feb 213

Say No To Asset Sales - National Rally


Frank Kitts Park, Wellington - 13 Feb 2013

Scoop Audio+Photos

By Mark P. Williams

WELLINGTON: Yesterday evening saw a gathering in Frank Kitts Park for the Say No To Asset Sales national rally. Speakers included Mayor Celia Wade-Brown, Maanu Paul from the Maori Council, Professor Jane Kelsey from the University of Auckland, Dr Geoff Bertram from Victoria University of Wellington, BERL Chief Economist Ganesh Nana, Justin Duckworth the Bishop of Wellington, Peter Love from Te Atiawa, and his granddaughter Kaia Love, and representatives from Greenpeace and Grey Power NZ. Musical interludes were provided by Tribal Rizing, Lucky Ngauere and guests.

A wide variety of arguments against the government's proposed assets sales were put forward by the speakers, addressing the issue in ethical, political, economic, ecological and social terms. Across the range of speeches, clear lines were drawn between partial privatisation and the economic problems facing ordinary New Zealanders; the range of knowledge and variety of approaches was a powerful counter to the government position.

The diverse speakers were unified in their calls for empowering New Zealanders, saying that the various privatisation policies of the government would only serve to increase longer term problems for ordinary people, rather than acting as a solution. Each put forward a case for further democratic action.

---

Peter Love of Te Atiawa

Peter Love of Te Atiawa, who opened proceedings with impassioned personal appeals to take collective ownership of New Zealand's resources. He countered the Prime Minister's repeated assertion of the government's position that no-one owns water, by saying that New Zealanders ought instead to say that everyone owns water. He was then followed by a passionate presentation from his granddaughter Kaira Love, appealing to shared identity and love of New Zealand's environment.

---

Mayor Celia Wade-Brown

Mayor Celia Wade-Brown took to the stage to give a local government orientated perspective, calling for a return to a philosophy of social provision.

She argued that sustainable development in New Zealand went hand in hand with strategic public ownership of national assets. She spoke of the need for a living wage and praised Greenpeace's recent economic report.

Click a link to play audio (or right-click to download) in either
MP3 format or in OGG format.

---

Professor Jane Kelsey


Professor Jane Kelsey from the University of Auckland gave a stirring speech about the importance of assets when considering New Zealand's trade policy. She linked the privatisation of assets and their subsequent stripping to the negotiation of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA). She suggested some alternative acronyms for New Zealanders to consider the economic implications of this particular trade agreement: 'Taking People's Power Away' and 'Toxic Profiteers Plundering Aotearoa'.

Click a link to play audio (or right-click to download) in either
MP3 format or in OGG format.

---

Ganesh Nana, Chief Economist at BERL and Geoff Bertram of the Institute for Governance and Policy at Victoria University of Wellington

Ganesh Nana, Chief Economist at BERL and Geoff Bertram of the Institute for Governance and Policy at Victoria University of Wellington questioned the validity of the government's fundamental position on assets sales.

Ganesh Nana forwarded the basic question of 'Why would you sell an asset?' arguing that the government's reasoning was inherently flawed. While Geoff Bertram proposed ways in which government ownership of assets as a possible solution to improving the problems of energy poverty and preventable childhood diseases linked to poor heating in New Zealand homes.

Click a link to play audio (or right-click to download) in either
MP3 format or in OGG format.

---

Justin Duckworth, Bishop of Wellington raised a series of ethical questions to the crowd.

Click a link to play audio (or right-click to download) in either
MP3 format or in OGG format.

---

Maanu Paul

Maanu Paul from the Maori Council spoke briefly about the role played by the Maori Council in protecting state owned assets and the importance of checking government power. He also called for a sit-in on Parliament grounds in opposition to the partial privatisation of State Owned Enterprises. He concluded with what he described as a new national anthem, which he sang in Te Reo and then English, whose refrain was 'I am the Water'.


Click a link to play audio (or right-click to download) in either
MP3 format or in OGG format.

*******


Click for big version.

--
ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

New HiveMind Project: What Should We Do About Sugar?

While most people agree that increased sugar consumption is a major cause of too many New Zealanders being overweight and obese, what we should do about this remains a matter of debate and argument. More>>

ALSO:


Gordon Campbell: On Vladimir Putin’s Wonderful, Fabulous, Very Good Year

Safe to say that no-one, but no-one has had a better 2016 than Vladimir Putin. What an annus mirabilis it has been for him. Somehow, Russia got away with directly interfering in the US election process, such that a friendly oligarch is about to take up residence in the White House, rather than a genuine rival. More>>

ALSO:


Gordon Campbell: On The Media Normalisation Of Trump

We all supposedly agree that the media is going to hell in a tabloid handbasket, but the trends to the contrary can be a bit harder to spot. In his 1970s book The Right Stuff, Tom Wolfe had mocked the way the media instinctively acts as what he called The Victorian Gentleman. More>>

ALSO:

Binoy Kampmark: The Reality Of Fake News

Fake news as reality; the inability to navigate the waters in which it swims; a weakness in succumbing to material best treated with a huge pinch of salt. That, we are told, is the new condition of the global information environment. More>>

Alastair Thompson: Helen Kelly And The Compassionless People
I wasn't a close friend of Helen Kelly's. But her passing has moved me to tears more than once in the past two weeks. I feel honoured to be one of the many who worked with her and was helped by her. More>>

Postnatal Depression: 'The Thief That Steals Motherhood' - Alison McCulloch

Post-natal depression is a sly and cruel illness, described by one expert as ‘the thief that steals motherhood’, it creeps up on its victims, hiding behind the stress and exhaustion of being a new parent, catching many women unaware and unprepared. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On News From The US Election Eve

Here’s a somewhat scary headline from October 30 on Nate Silver’s 538 site, which summed up the statistical factors in play at that point: “The Cubs Have A Smaller Chance Of Winning Than Trump Does” More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news