Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | News Flashes | Scoop Features | Scoop Video | Strange & Bizarre | Search

 


Fiji: China Stepped In When US and UK Withdrew

Fiji High Commissioner: China Stepped In When United States and United Kingdom Withdrew

In a speech given on Tuesday to the Pacific Islands Society at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), the Fiji High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, Mr. Solo Mara, argued that the Pacific Islands region has a 'voice that is beginning to be recognized on the global stage' as it emerges as a possible "geo-strategic political pitch for the super-powers, particularly China and the United States."

On this political pitch, the High Commissioner maintained that "the (United States) and China to Pacific Islanders represent two sides of the same coin." Yet, his prepared remarks expressed far more criticism of western engagement in the region than that of China.

While the High Commissioner "welcomed" the "renewed interest" by the United States and cited former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's attendance at the Pacific Islands Forum Leaders Meeting in 2012 as "remarkable" development and a "clear confirmation of Washington's realization that it must be more involved in the Pacific Islands," he also pointed out "that Mrs. Clinton was beaten to the islands by a multitude of senior Chinese Government officials" and suggested that the main motivation for America's "renewed interest" may have been to prevent "losing its influence entirely" in the region. He then went on to condemn past actions by former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice; implying that those actions failed to demonstrate a genuine interest in a "partnership based on mutual respect."

On the other hand, the High Commissioner said China was a "sincere development partner" that has demonstrated a sustained commitment in the region and "stepped in when other western development partners, such as the (United States) and the (United Kingdom), withdrew." From this perspective, he called "improved and closer relations with China ... an inevitable progression" and said that China had been more effective than Australia at filling "the vacuum" left when other western development partners pulled out.

In offering praise, the High Commissioner made no explicit mention of the significant development aid and disaster response contributions provided by Australia, the United States, and New Zealand to the region. However, he did "applaud the (European Union) for having provided eight million euros for a five-year (climate change) research and adaptation project" and singled out the "Chinese Exim Bank loans (for) providing much needed infrastructure development for economic development in the islands."

While his speech provided a notably more favorable assessment of Chinese engagement in the region, the High Commissioner nevertheless maintained that the Pacific Island Counties would "do well to engage productively with both superpowers." He also expressed his belief that the region remains "geographically ... big enough to accommodate all of our development partners." However, he cautioned that development partners "must engage from a position of respect and understanding with Pacific Island Countries" that acknowledges the region's need to "prioritize human security, as limited funds mean that the most pressing issues must be addressed."

On this point, the High Commissioner called attention to the significant "difference in the perception of security threats" that exists between Pacific Island Countries and those outside the region. This followed his enumeration of the major human security threats facing the Pacific Islands region, including climate change, illegal fishing, HIV/AIDS, and non-communicable diseases as well as the "general perception, amongst Pacific Island peoples, that their immediate development needs are not being addressed."

After conceding that "the Pacific Islands region must accept that the interests of its donors and superpowers will at times dictate what security activities they prioritize and fund," the High Commissioner urged western countries to recognize the gulf that he implied existed between their security priorities and those of the Pacific Island Countries. By doing so, he said that they would better "understand why the Pacific Islands have sought closer ties with Asia in their pursuit of 'security' in the Pacific Islands sense."

The High Commissioner closed his remarks by declaring climate change "the greatest threat to human security in the Pacific." He then went on to issue a challenge to both the United States and China. As they continue to "jostle for position" in the region, he called on both countries to "acknowledge their own role in and responsibility for Climate Change" and "help Pacific Islanders, who are most affected and who are


New Zealand High Commissioner: Shared Values Driving Ever Stronger US-NZ Partnership

In a speech given on Monday to the Pacific Islands Society at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), the Acting New Zealand High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, Mr. Rob Taylor, argued that shared values, not just shared interests, are driving the renewed strategic partnership between the United States and New Zealand.

According to Mr. Taylor, the 2010 Wellington Declaration provided a “key turning point in United States – New Zealand relations” that has enabled the two countries “to move beyond policy differences that emerged n the mid-1980s” and instead “focus on the future with emphasis on areas of cooperation.”

More than two years later, Mr. Taylor believes that the NZ-US strategic partnership has moved into high gear with both Wellington and Washington confident that this period of renewed cooperation “will endure.”

Looking ahead, Mr. Taylor says that “on-going and future cooperation between the two nations” will place “particular emphasis on the South Pacific.” This includes investing further in joint initiatives in the region, such as renewable energy, disaster response, climate change adaptation, and enhanced dialogue on regional security.”

Mr. Taylor also stressed that the United States and New Zealand are working “to enhance Pacific capability to catch and process more of their own fisheries resources,” with New Zealand now working the United States, Australia, and France to “to provide maritime surveillance of Pacific Island States, in particular their Exclusive Economic Zones. “

Eddie Walsh is an accredited foreign correspondent. He currently serves as a fellow at the Federation of American Scientists and president of the Pacific Islands Society. Follow him on either Twitter or Tumblr.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Syed Atiq ul Hassan: Eye-Opener For Islamic Community

An event of siege, terror and killing carried out by Haron Monis in the heart of Sydney business district has been an eye-opener for the Islamic Community in Australia. Haron was shot down before he killed two innocent people, a lawyer and a manager ... More>>

Jonathan Cook: US Feels The Heat On Palestine Vote At UN

The floodgates have begun to open across Europe on recognition of Palestinian statehood. On 12 December the Portuguese parliament became the latest European legislature to call on its government to back statehood, joining Sweden, Britain, Ireland, France ... More>>

ALSO:


Fightback: MANA Movement Regroups, Call For Mana Wahine Policy

In the wake of this years’ electoral defeat, the MANA Movement is regrouping. On November 29th, Fightback members attended a Members’ Hui in Tāmaki/Auckland, with around 70 attending from around the country. More>>

Ramzy Baroud: The Mockingjay Of Palestine: “If We Burn, You Burn With Us”

Raed Mu’anis was my best friend. The small scar on top of his left eyebrow was my doing at the age of five. I urged him to quit hanging on a rope where my mother was drying our laundry. He wouldn’t listen, so I threw a rock at him. More>>

ALSO:

Don Franks: Future Of Work Commission: Labour's Shrewd Move

Lunging boldly towards John Key, shouting 'Cut the crap!' - Andrew Little was great, wasn't he? Labour's new leader spoke for many people fed up with Key's flippant arrogant deceit. Andrew Little nailing the Prime minister on lying about contacting a rightwing ... More>>

Asia-Pacific Journal: MSG Headache, West Papuan Heartache? Indonesia’s Melanesian Foray

Asia and the Pacific--these two geographic, political and cultural regions encompass entire life-worlds, cosmologies and cultures. Yet Indonesia’s recent enthusiastic outreach to Melanesia indicates an attempt to bridge both the constructed and actual ... More>>

Valerie Morse: The Security State: We Should Not Be Surprised, But We Should Be Worried

On the very day that the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security released her report into the actions of people the Prime Minister’s office in leaking classified Security Intelligence Service (NZSIS) documents to right-wing smearmonger Cameron ... More>>

Ramzy Baroud: PFLP Soul-Searching: Rise And Fall Of Palestine’s Socialists

When news reports alleged that the two cousins behind the Jerusalem synagogue attack on 18 November were affiliated with the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, a level of confusion reigned. Why the PFLP? Why now? More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news