Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | News Flashes | Scoop Features | Scoop Video | Strange & Bizarre | Search

 


PM Post-Cabinet Press Conference - 22 April 2013

PM: Mighty River Power| NZ Power| National's Potential Coalition Partners

PM Post-Cabinet Press Conference - 22 April 2013

Scoop Audio+Video+Photos

By Anne Russell

*******

Today the Prime Minister announced that the government will make a supplementary disclosure to the Mighty River Power document. The impetus was the Labour- Greens NZ Power proposal, which had caused some uncertainties within the sharemarket, wiping $500m from the stock exchange. He compared a centrally-planned electricity system to a similar operation in South Korea, and claimed that it has been responsible for electricity price hikes and increased work hours.

Key claimed that a competitive electricity market would bring down the rate of price increases, and that state bureaucracy was an inefficient method for controlling the electricity market. NZ Power would introduce regulatory uncertainty, he claimed, which would scare off investors.

Key briefly mentioned the 2013 budget, and stated that the government was on track for a surplus in 2014-15. He also mentioned the return of 60 personnel from the Provincial Reconstruction Team in Afghanistan, which marked the end of New Zealand's involvement there. Thirty Afghan interpreters and their families had also come to New Zealand for resettlement.

*******

Click a link to play audio (or right-click to download) in either
MP3 format or in OGG format.

The majority of questions directed at Key on the NZ Power scheme attempted to gauge how the government felt about both the proposal and its timing. Despite referring to the idea as "a huge setback for New Zealand", Key did not appear overly concerned about NZ Power--in part because it only has the potential to be enacted if a Labour- Green coalition wins the election next year. Despite this, legal obligations prompted the release of a supplementary disclosure on Mighty River. Key was asked whether or not the government would eventually buy back Mighty River if it appeared to be in New Zealand's best interests, but he said no.

In light of NZ Power, Key characterised Labour-Greens as 'far left', and said the election would be a contest between centre-right and far left. This led to questions about whether or not Colin Craig and NZ First would be potential coalition partners for National. Key made little comment on the issue.

Brief attention was given to the rain and how it would affect farming--Key said support for farmers would remain until September 30th. Some questions were asked about Japan joining the TPP, which Key approves of, but it remains unclear when the TPP will be finalised.

Key was asked whether or not the government found it difficult to deal with numerous Wellington local government bodies at once, as compared to the Auckland supercity structure. He said that Wellington was smaller, and that any amalgamation plans would have to be led by the Wellington City Council.

He was asked whether a governmental focus on China's relationship with New Zealand was approved of by the population. Fielding the answer with "I'll just wing it", Key said that being involved with a country when we're selling more than buying was good for business.

Lastly, the press gallery inquired about Maurice Williamson, whose speech on marriage equality has gone viral, enabling him to appear on Ellen Degeneres' television show. Key referred to him as "our own little gay icon". When asked if it was inappropriate for Williamson to take the title of gay icon when he has given minimal support to a bill which benefits a subset of privileged queers, Key said that Williamson has always had a very liberal record on conscience votes. However, it was pointed out that Williamson voted against civil unions in 2005.

*******

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Myopia Of The Business News

Listening to the business news is a bit like eavesdropping on the radio transmissions from space aliens. There is no discernible connection between the concerns of the captains of these space ships – the bank economists and the finance house spokesmen – and the concerns of ordinary listeners back on Planet Earth. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Clinton, Sanders, Trump And Cruz

Come November, the world will have a new US president-elect and the least unlikely winner still looks to be Hillary Clinton. Right now though, the polls are showing a rocky stretch ahead for her in the immediate future. More>>

ALSO:

Binoy Kampmark: Sean Penn And El Chapo - Vanity, Hollywood And Reportage

Leaving aside Sean Penn’s personal history with drug use, let alone alleged efforts to get a slice of celebrity in portraying a drug lord, the furore surrounding his interview with El Chapo is instructive in a few respects. One is worth noting: the blind rage it has provoked with some US political figures and advocates who show how utterly lacking in understanding they are of their own liberal market system... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Podemos, And Spain’s Election Stalemate

By hard grassroots effort, it convincingly rejected the fragmented, individualising forces that had shaped political life for the past few decades – instead, it organized its supporters on the basis of their common, communal experience via collective decision-making aimed at rolling back (a) the austerity-driven cutbacks in public services and (b) the home evictions of those unable to meet their mortgage payments. More>>

Binoy Kampmark: Merkel, Refugees And The Cologne Attacks

Huge pressure was already on Angela Merkel’s shoulders prior to the New Year celebrations. When it came in its waves of chaos on the eve, the security services in Cologne were found wanting. The police document from Cologne, leaked to Der Spiegel, speaks of chaos and lack of control. More>>

NZ Media In 2015: ‘Digital First’ Strategies Put Journalists Last

Journalism in New Zealand is threatened by the constant culling of editorial jobs and current affairs programmes… Additionally, journalists investigating issues which are in public interest have become under scrutiny as seen most clearly in the cases of Nicky Hager and Heather Du-Plessis Allen. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news