Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | News Flashes | Scoop Features | Scoop Video | Strange & Bizarre | Search

 


Cunliffe: Chorus vs Commerce Commission | "Roast Busters"

David Cunliffe: Chorus vs Commerce Commission | “Roast Busters”

David Cunliffe's weekly pre-caucus press conference – 4 November 2013

Scoop Audio+Video+Photos

By Hamish Cardwell


Click for big version.

David Cunliffe called the government's broadband policy an “extraordinary failure” and questioned the actions of the police towards the so called “Roast Busters” group.

*******

*******

At his weekly pre-caucus press standup Mr Cunliffe said the government wanted to “re-nationalise ...[Chorus] because of the extraordinary failure of its broadband policy”.

Ultra-fast broadband network provider Chorus has warned that the price set by the Commerce Commission for broadband could potential trigger a loan default.

The government should enact the Commerce Commissions recommendations, and look at why New Zealander's uptake of ultra fast broadband had been “desultory slow”, Mr Cunliffe said.

Not enough content online and slow hook-up times had not given people enough incentive to join up, he said.

He did not think that Chorus would go under although there needed to be more discussions them about this.

If Labour was in government they would follow the Commerce Commission's ruling as well as have an online content strategy to incentivise people signing up to UFB.

“What we have here is a statement from the regulator that New Zealand households should not pay $100 a year each extra just to bail out a bad contract from the government.”

Mr Cunliffe said UFB uptake was at 2%, which was the underlying reason why Chorus' profitability was lower than forecast.

On other matters Mr Cunliffe said Labour would support the Harmful Digital Communication Bill which was being being introduced in Parliament today in the wake of the “Roast Busters” group who filmed group sex with intoxicated minors. However, the bill did not get to the core issue which was the reluctance of victims to go to the police.

He said he had concerns about why the issues were not bought up earlier, why the local community was not advised and wanted to know what steps were taken to protect innocent young people who were at risk of predation.

“I want to know what they [the police] were doing.”

*******

Click a link to play audio (or right-click to download) in either
MP3 format or in OGG format.

*******


Click for big version.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Scoop Is Crowd Funding: Help Scoop.co.nz To Fly In 2015

Scoop is NZ's oldest and largest independent online news service. We have described ourselves as fiercely independent for more than a decade and we would like to stay that way... By making Scoop’s connection to the public and contributors more explicit we hope to achieve the level of support and sustainability that will enable Scoop to fly as a community asset. More>>

ALSO:

Greek Riddles: Gordon Campbell On The Recent Smackdown Over Greece

There had been a fortnight of fevered buildup. Yet here we are in the aftermath of the February 28 showdown between the new Syriza government in Greece and the European Union “troika” and… no-one seems entirely sure what happened. Did the asteroid miss Earth? More>>

ALSO:

McBeth On The Cricket World Cup: It's How They Handle Fan Pressure

Brendon McCullum's team has achieved impressive results in the lengthy buildup to the contest and they deserve to be among the favoured teams, but... Their results need to be kept in perspective and fans should get a much better idea of the Black Caps chances when they face England in the capital on Friday. More>>

Keith Rankin: Contribution Through Innovation

The economic contribution of businesses and people is often quite unrelated to their taxable incomes. EHome, as a relatively new company, may have never earned any taxable income. Its successors almost certainly will earn income and pay tax. Yet it was eHome itself who made the biggest contribution by starting the venture in the first place. More>>

ALSO:

A Public Conversation: Reinventing News As A Public Right

Alastair Thompson: Oh how the mighty have fallen. Once journalism was possibly a noble profession, though that is certainly now, to quote our Prime Minister, a 'contestable' notion. It certainly seemed at least a little noble when I joined the ranks of reporters in 1989 . But ... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news