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Serial rapist should get substantial sentence - ex-detective

The detective who led the original investigation into serial rapist Stewart Murray Wilson says the 71-year-old should get a substantial sentence for his latest convictions.

Stewart Murray
Wilson in court

Stewart Murray Wilson in court Photo: RNZ / Dan Cook

Wilson was jailed for 21 years in March 1996 for violent sexual attacks on women and girls throughout a 25 year period. The convictions included rape, bestiality, stupefying and ill-treatment of children.

He was yesterday found guilty at the High Court in Auckland of more rapes - including that of a 9-year-old girl. He was charged last year over the offences which mostly occurred in the 1970s.

The jury found him guilty of 11 charges including rape, attempted rape and indecency with a girl under 12. Sentencing is due on 29 November.

The serial rapist has served his full 21-year jail term but still lives on the Whanganui Prison ground - outside the wire - on an extended supervision order with strict conditions.

Colin Mackay, who led the Blenheim investigation in the 1990s, said the sentence must reflect the seriousness of the charges, particularly with a child involved.

Wilson should get a substantial sentence, or preventive detention if was an option under the law, he said.

"I think the current judge will end up sentencing to further imprisonment" - Colin Mackay duration 4:47
from Morning Report

Click a link to play audio (or right-click to download) in either
MP3 format or in OGG format.

Wilson's lawyer, Andrew McKenzie, believes it is unlikely his client will get a harsh additional sentence for his new convictions.

Mr McKenzie said the judge would have to take into account Wilson's previous 21-year sentence.

"The early indications are that any extra sentence or extra imprisonment will be at the lower end of any scale."

"The prison environment is not ideal I'm sure but will at least give him some human contact" - Wilson's lawyer Andrew McKenzie duration 3:01
from Morning Report

Click a link to play audio (or right-click to download) in either
MP3 format or in OGG format.

Mr Mackay said he "would have absolutely no doubt whatsoever" that there were other victims who had not been prepared to come forward.

He said between the time Wilson first went to court in 1995 - when his name became public and he was seen on television - and the conclusion of the trial more people contacted police.

"I started another file and we had ... either 8 or 12 people who came forward as prospective victims.

"It was decided by the Crown Law Office of the day that we should communicate with those people and tell them that 21 years imprisonment was a pretty substantial penalty and that we wouldn't gain anything by taking further prosecution action against him."


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