Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

Strong 6.2-magnitude quake felt across central NZ

A strong, deep 6.2-magnitude earthquake that hit 20 km south of Taumarunui has been felt around the country.

The earthquake was centered 20 km south of Taumaranui. Photo: GeoNet

GeoNet has reported the quake was a magnitude 6.2, although it was centered at a depth of 207km.

Civil Defence said there was no tsunami threat from the shake.

Minister Kris Fa'afoi said his staff are in touch with the Manawatu civil defence.

He is urging caution as there could be aftershocks.

Fire and Emergency said there were no reports of damage.

More than 15,000 people have already reported feeling the quake on GeoNet.






Parliament was suspended after the quake, although MPs have now returned.

Deputy speaker Anne Tolley was sitting in the chair during debate on a Government Bill, and made the call to suspend Parliament.

The video below shows the moment the earthquake hit Parliament (around 2.30 in).

"I never thought I'd have to do that, suspend the House until we find out what's happened," she said.

"There were public in the galleries and people need to just make sure their staff are okay. We're in the safest building probably in the country - but just to make sure and get some advice."

A Taumarunui local said the earthquake made the second storey of his home sway from side to side.

Adrian Doyle said that while the shaking wasn't very strong - it lasted a long time.

"I'm on the second storey of my house and it was definitely swaying from side-to-side," he said.

"I hopped under the desk and then realised that wasn't the most prudent placed to be because it's not a very strong desk, so hopped in the door frame and waited it out."

Mr Doyle said he doesn't expect there will much damage in the center town

Lyn Neeson, a farmer south west of Taumarunui, said she felt the quake for about two minutes.

She said the quake rumbled but didn't cause any shaking.

"I watched the clock 'cause I thought this was going on for a while and I was trying to remember was it one minute or two minutes before you were supposed to get gone and so it went on for nearly two minutes."

"It didn't get any worse so that is why I didn't move but it was just rumbling, rumbling."

"I was looking around and there wasn't much movement. I have a glass table and the flowers on it were shaking."

"I looked over and there was a couple of cards on a desk and they were just moving but nothing fell off."

Ms Neeson said her power and the internet went off.

"The power came back on pretty shortly afterwards, but I am still struggling to get my internet back on because it's satellite and you have to reset it."


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Commercial Scoop User? Help Scoop Survive (and Thrive!)

The ScoopPro licensing terms require that commercial users of Scoop.co.nz pay a reasonable fee in order to access the Scoop site so that this same information remains free and accessible to the wider public regardless of their disposable income. More>>

ALSO:

Joseph Cederwall: Building a Community Newsroom

A combination of new technology, ideas, institutions and business models and a renewed energy and commitment by the Scoop team, means Scoop aims to be at the forefront of the development of this renaissance that we term ‘News 3.0’. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop 3.0: Saving The News

Scoop Co-Founder Alastair Thompson - One of the saddest aspects of the decline of the news industry, not just here in NZ - but everywhere, is that it often seems invisible, in large part because news is a confidence business... More>>

ALSO:

UK Cabinet Backs Deal: Gordon Campbell On The Latest Roll Of The Brexit Dice

Brexit has left the British public looking like a nation of Wellington bus commuters. In both cases, the unholy mess bears no resemblance to what people were promised or the spin being used to justify it. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Democratic Leadership And Trump

On the big picture, the poll predictions were dead right. In the end, the Democratic Party won a clear victory in the House, and lost as expected in the Senate, where it had been defending at least 10 seats in regions that had voted heavily for Trump in 2016. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog