Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | News Flashes | Scoop Features | Scoop Video | Strange & Bizarre | Search

 


Scoop Column: Scoop Not Part Of Dumbed Down Media

NZ First leader, Winston Peters, decided to play journalist in a speech yesterday and again attacked the media saying it was dumbed-down and will trot out any old rubbish and pass it off as news. John Howard reports.

NZ First leader Winston Peters said yesterday: "There is no such thing in this country as investigative reporting. I thought today I would play journalist, and give you some thoughts about Labour, and their policies, and make a few comments about a new political party called "NACT" - that's National and ACT." (See the Parliament wire for his full speech.)

Well, we're not dumbed-down and our readers won't like being indirectly insulted either. Perhaps Mr Peters retains an old media mentality.

For the last few years most New Zealanders have well understood the news media does not consist of just newspapers, radio and television.

150 million people around the world visit news websites each day on what is popularly called the New Media - the Internet. Those "hits" on news-stories are often e-mailed to friends and associates so, in reality, the actual readership of a new media news page is far higher.

Clearly, the attraction and popularity of the new media for people is exactly because of what Mr Peters claims is not happening in NZ - investigative reporting of the news behind the news.

Scoop correspondents and staff, for example, have recently broken some quite signficant investigative stories. The background of B. J. Habibie, the IMF and World Bank scandals, Indonesian and US corruption, the Bank Bali scandal, the Lord of the Rings, the East Timor, Pakistan and APEC backgrounders, to name just a few.

However, just because CNN publishes an on-line edition or TVNZ or the newspapers have a website doesn't make them part of the new media. In fact, around the world, many old media editors and journalists are high-tailing it out of newspapers and television as fast as they can.

There is an conscious effort on behalf of most of those involved in the new media not to subscribe to the same old tired values with the risk of having stories "spiked" by editors with agendas. That's exciting for journalists because it means more informed consumers which the new media is helping to create.

There was recently a move to establish an Internet Press Guild. We don't need an Internet Press Guild because we have informed consumers who are our watchdogs. There is no need for "professional" gatekeepers any more than there is a need for the kind of government who would like to stick its nose under the tent.

Not many in the new media would yield to the "wisdom" of an Internet Press Guild or government gatekeepers either.

The Internet new media is the free press - the real thing. It aims to give the news, all the news, in a concise and attractive form and it gives it as early, if not earlier, than any other reliable medium. It aims to give the news impartially, without fear or favour regardless of party, sect or interest involved.

Most in the new media do not let anyone else set their goals, objectives and priorities and, most importantly, they don't try to distort our perception of reality. It is not seduced by television contracts, multi-million dollar deals nor does it rely on "celebrities." Sure, the new media takes advertising. But hell, everybody's got to eat.

But dumbed-down? - Don't think so.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Werewolf: Living With Rio’s Olympic Ruins

Mariana Cavalcanti Critics of the Olympic project can point a discernible pattern in the delivery of Olympics-related urban interventions: the belated but rushed inaugurations of faulty and/or unfinished infrastructures... More>>

Live Blog On Now: Open Source//Open Society Conference

The second annual Open Source Open Society Conference is a 2 day event taking place on 22-23 August 2016 at Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington… Scoop is hosting a live blog summarising the key points of this exciting conference. More>>

ALSO:

Buildup:

Gordon Campbell: On The Politicising Of The War On Drugs In Sport

It hasn’t been much fun at all to see how “war on drugs in sport” has become a proxy version of the Cold War, fixated on Russia. This weekend’s banning of the Russian long jumper Darya Klishina took that fixation to fresh extremes. More>>

ALSO:

Binoy Kampmark: Kevin Rudd’s Failed UN Secretary General Bid

Few sights are sadder in international diplomacy than seeing an aging figure desperate for honours. In a desperate effort to net them, he scurries around, cultivating, prodding, wishing to be noted. Finally, such an honour is netted, in all likelihood just to shut that overly keen individual up. More>>

Open Source / Open Society: The Scoop Foundation - An Open Model For NZ Media

Access to accurate, relevant and timely information is a crucial aspect of an open and transparent society. However, in our digital society information is in a state of flux with every aspect of its creation, delivery and consumption undergoing profound redefinition... More>>

Keeping Out The Vote: Gordon Campbell On The US Elections

I’ll focus here on just two ways that dis-enfranchisement is currently occurring in the US: (a) by the rigging of the boundary lines for voter districts and (b) by demanding elaborate photo IDs before people are allowed to cast their vote. More>>

Ramzy Baroud: Being Black Palestinian - Solidarity As A Welcome Pathology

It should come as no surprise that the loudest international solidarity that accompanied the continued spate of the killing of Black Americans comes from Palestine; that books have already been written and published by Palestinians about the plight of their Black brethren. In fact, that solidarity is mutual. More>>

ALSO:


Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Top Scoops
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news