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Big Victory For Kiwi Cricketers

The Black Caps have pulled off a huge win against all odds over an astounded West Indian side in Hamilton today, thanks largely to the magnificent efforts of Kiwi all-rounder Chris Cairns.

On the final day of the match the West Indies were wrapped up for a mere 90 runs with Chris Cairns taking seven wickets for 27 runs off 21 overs, and a total of 10 wickets for 100 runs for the match. It took Cairns 62 runs to take his first wicket, leaving him to take the remaining nine for only 38 runs.

Cairns’ performance was characterised by good pace, bounce and clever use of the slower ball and was the best bowling performance ever on the Hamilton test ground. His performance with the ball came hard on the heels of a commanding knock of 72 runs off not many more balls in the Kiwi first innings.

The victory is against the odds given that the West Indies reached 276 runs and batted for 365 minutes before losing a wicket. The Windies then lost 20 wickets for a paltry 186 runs.

The Kiwi run chase was a mere formality, chasing only 70 runs. Craig Spearman and Nathan Astle bought up the runs at 3.20pm after Craig Spearman was clean bowled by West Indian pace man Courtenay Walsh for 30. Opener Matt Horne retired hurt after copping a sharp delivery on the finger from Walsh. He is having X-rays but signs from the Kiwi medical team do not look promising for Horne to make the second Boxing day test at the Basin reserve in Wellington.

Stephen Fleming came down with a stomach virus and did not play on the last day. He is expected to be fine for the next match.

This victory was the 43rd test victory in New Zealand’s cricketing history and was the fifth against the West Indies and the second ever at the Hamilton ground.


ends

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