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National Radio 7am Bulletin

Fiji Sports Boycott – Electricity Inquiry – Syria – Korean Détente – Pope Gunman Freed – Solomon Islands – Maori and Budget – Sick Shipley – Roads Closed - Sport

FIJI SPORTS BOYCOTT: Fiji’s Rugby Football Union is angry that the Government has decided to ban visiting Fijian sporting teams. The NZRFU is not pleased either. Two Fijian rugby sides will be prevented from touring, the under 19’s and under 21’s.

ELECTRICITY INQUIRY: The Consumers Institute is disappointed that the Electricity Inquiy is not heralding lower prices wants the government to be brave enough to take on the lines companies.

SYRIA: Syrian President Assad’s funeral brings hopes of middle east peace.

KOREAN DÉTENTE: The leaders of North and South Korea have met for the first time ever. The summit got off on the right foot with smiling leaders.

POPE GUNMAN FREED: Italy has granted clemency to the Turkish gunman who attempted to kill the Pope in 1991.

SOLOMON ISLANDS: The speaker of the Solomon Islands Parliament says he fears for the future of the country if the PM does not step down. There are fears the meeting may not go ahead unless the Eagle Force returns the police arsenal.

MAORI AND BUDGET: The Labour/Alliance Government delivers its first budget tomorrow with Maori wanting to see their contribution to the Government at the ballot box reflected.

SICK SHIPLEY: The National Party Leader Jenny Shipley is recooperating from an angioplasty.

ROADS CLOSED: The Desert Road has closed due to snow and ice. Motorists are advised to take the West Ruapehu road. All roads are open in the South Island except the Arthur’s Pass road which is being worked on.

SPORT: The NZ Basketball team has lost and a touring Argentinian rugby side has won in Brisbane.

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