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The Evening Post

CYFS to 'red flag' unsuitable caregivers - Wellington schools get extra $7.5 million - Family appeals to save cat-killer - Russia seeks help as SOS signals stop - Big southerly predicted to hit at weekend - Body-shoot policy to be reviewed - Inside headlines - Sportslead - Editorial

CYFS to 'red flag' unsuitable caregivers: A national database of child caregivers being established will "red flag" people deemed unsuitable, whether or not they have criminal convictions.

Wellington schools get extra $7.5 million: Wgtn regional schools will an extra $7.5m next year.

Family appeals to save cat-killer: The front page pic shows Toots the cat killing dog on death row.

Russia seeks help as SOS signals stop: Russia at last called for international aid today in it's desperate bid to save 118 submariners trapped on the Barents seabed in a disabled nuclear submarine.

Big southerly predicted to hit on weekend: A big southerly storm is predicted to hit Wellington this weekend.

Body-shoot policy to be reviewed: Police policy of shooting a person's body will be reviewed by the Police Complaints authority:

Inside headlines:

-Jubilation at passing of employment Bill;
-MPs to consider opinion poll ban;
-Govt faces fire over armoured vehicles;
-Work and Income gives away computers;
-Hopes for closer relations between gown and town;
-Angry CCH nurses warn of strikes;
-INXS cancels, blames slow sales;
-Schoolboy held teachers at bay with kitchen knife;
-Councils expect tender savings;
-Waitara wick will smoulder- Kaumatua;
-Village may strike carpark hitch.

Sportslead:
Smith goes for more pace in pack: The reintroduction of Scott Robertson and Greg Somerville to the bench indicates the All Black's intention to lift the pace of the game further in Sunday's Tri Nations test in Johnannesburg, Bok coach Nick Mallett said today.

Editorial: Police report won't erase public unrest.


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