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National Radio Midday Bulletin

...reposted to correct wire...

Storm – Trampers Found – Cancer Inquiry – Algal Bloom – Olympics Doping – Han Murders – Early Childhood Scholarships – Wellington Nurses Strike – Tainui Appeal – Bengali Floods – Multiple Jeopardy – ERA Education – Art Monopoly

STORM: Winds bash North Island. Widespread damage from Dargaville to Hawke’s Bay. The storm dropped 10cm of snow on the central plateau. Stock losses expected in East Cape and Hawke’s Bay. Lots of fences and trees knocked down. In Gisborne a house was seriously damaged. SH1 is closed from Rangipo to Waiouru. SH5 has now reopened. Wairoa-Gisborne road is open but subject to delays. Power cuts have occurred . 4000 people are still without power in the Auckland/BOP region. 100,000 had no power earlier this morning.

TRAMPERS FOUND: Three missing trampers have been found in Kaimanawa Forest Park. Taupo police have also gone in to rescue another party which spent an alarming night in the bush. The party is not believed to be in any danger.

CANCER INQUIRY: Gisborne power cuts have delayed proceedings of the Cervical Cancer inquiry. Ailsa Duthie says typing and editing the ruling has held up its release. She was expected to release a decision this morning on whether she will be going to court to require the Ministry of Health to provide patient records to her inquiry.

ALGAL BLOOM: Toxicity of algal bloom increases and reaches Marlborough. Some Marlborough farms remain clear.

OLYMPICS – DOPE: A growing doping crisis is ripping the gloss off the Olympics. Despite the best efforts of Cathy Freeman drugs are back to the fore in reporting. There have now been six positive dope tests at the games with the latest case involving a multiple gold medal winning Roumanian gymnast. Meanwhile US sprinter Marion Jones victories are now threatened through guilt by association to her shotputting husband who - it has been revealed - tested positive at a meet before the games.

OLYMPICS – DOPE: US officials are investigating their drug testing systems following revelations concern Marion Jones husband. The positive dope test has had an effect on US team which is leading the medal standings. “It is distracting,” says a spokesman.

HAN MURDERS: Korean businessman Robert Han has admitted stabbing and bludgeoning his family to death. The man is pleading not guilty to murder on grounds of insanity. Han traveled to Korea before returning to kill his family. Witnesses from Korea said he was fine until two weeks before he left to return home.

EARLY CHILDHOOD SCHOLARSHIPS: 105 $10,000 scholarships have been announced aimed at Maori and PI early childhood educators. The scholarships will be paid in three installments over four years.

WELLINGTON NURSES STRIKE: Capital Coast Health says it has contingency plans in place for a nurses strike. Half the hospital’s nurses will go on strike from midnight Sunday for 16 hours. The hospital’s negotiator says that planning to minimise disruption.

TAINUI APPEAL: Tainui Leader Sir Robert Mahuta is to appeal a decision of the High Court which may affect the ownership of the Warriors rugby league team.

BENGALI FLOODS: The authorities in the West Bengal area are admitting to releasing too much water through dams. The weather could still deteriorate and more flooding may follow.

MULTIPLE JEOPARDY: The Law Commission has released a discussion party on double jeopardy. The policeman involved in a case of a man who was acquitted of murder but convicted of perversion of justice thinks that double jeopardy should be done away with altogether.

ERA EDUCATION: A 16-page-booklet has been sent to employers and community groups on the Employment Relations Act. A nationwide newspaper campaign is also underway part of a $1.3 million total public education campaign for the new law.

ART MONOPOLY: Sothebys is paying $256 million in a settlement after a three year investigation for monopolism. Sothebys and Christies have been accused of price fixing in the auctions market and remain under investigation for monopolism.

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