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National Radio Midday Report

Deported Filipinos – Passenger Rail – Gisborne Rail Line – National Superannuation – Treason Charge – Middle East Human Rights – Middle East Peace Process – Cervical Cancer Case – MMP Referendum – Legal Aid Change – Fauvaux Strait Crash – Wairarapa Flooding – Traffic Jam

- DEPORTED FILIPINOS: The immigration consultant of the Filipino family that was mistakenly deported to Malaysia yesterday wants clear procedures established governing removal orders. The family are being flown back to NZ today and will be given temporary permits until their case can be heard. The move follows tough new Immigration Laws. Immigration Minister Lianne Dalziel says she won’t apologise for the laws, and says the family’s case was a one off mistake.

- PASSENGER RAIL: The Wellington Regional Council says passenger train services in the region are safe for the time being. This comes after the decision from Tranz Rail that they want to sell their passenger services and concentrate on long distance freight haulage. Meanwhile, the Auckland Regional Council says they want to push ahead with their plans for Auckland train transport.

- GISBORNE RAIL LINE: Tranz Rail’s management will have talks with the Deputy Prime Minister and the Minister of Finance before making a decision about the Napier Gisborne line. A company spokesman says the line is not commercially viable and they want to close it.

- NATIONAL SUPERANUATION: The chair of the disbanded superannuation taskforce, Angela Folks, says the Government’s proposed superannuation fund will not reflect the changing nature of retirement and the workforce. She says New Zealand will move to later retirement, and policy needs to be flexible enough to adapt to these changes.

- TREASON CHARGE: In Fiji, George Speight and 15 supporters have been formally charged with treason in relation to the May coup that overthrew then Prime Minister Mahendra Chaudry’s Government. The cases were immediately adjourned to October 25.

- MIDDLE EAST HUMAN RIGHTS: The United Nations commission on human rights has voted to hold a special session to investigate possible human rights abuses in the Middle east.

- MIDDLE EAST PEACE PROCESS: The United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan has held talks with Israeli PM Ehud Barak and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat. He said calm is now needed, and statements that would lead to tension on either side must be avoided.

- CERVICAL CANCER CASE: The medical tribunal hearing a charge of disgraceful conduct gainst Northland gaenocologist Graham Parry has heard this morning the Medical Council had grave concerns about Mr Parry’s judgement. The jury has heard that he performed an ultrasound, but no internal examination after cervical bleeding.

- MMP REFERENDUM: National Leader Jenny Shipley is attempting to bypass a Parliamentary review of MMP and force a referendum on the issue at the next election. She intends lodging a members bill that would see a referendum before the next election.

- LEGAL AID CHANGE: Legislation to change the way legal aid is administered has been passed unanimously in Parliament.

- FAUVAUX STRAIT CRASH: Victims of the 1998 Fauvaux Strait crash and the survivors and families of those who died have signed an out of court settlement with the airline, Southern Air.

- WAIRARAPA FLOODING: Six roads and SH1 remain closed in Wairarapa after heavy rain and flooding in the area over the past 2 weeks. Further heavy rain has been forecast.

- TRAFFIC JAM: Road works caused huge delays for thousands of commuter on Auckland’s harbour bridge today.

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