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TV1 News

SCOTT WATSON TRIAL: Dramatic evidence in the double murder trial of Scott Watson. Water taxi driver Guy Wallace back in the stand and this time he identified Scott Watson as the mystery man on his water taxi. But soon after he ruled out the Blade as the boat that he dropped Watson and the two missing teenagers off at. Watson's boat was too short and a different colour, he said. Crown asked if he could identify the accused in a TVNZ video tape - he said he couldn't. Under cross-examination Wallace said the man in the bar was unshaven. Q: At an earlier hearing you ruled him [Watson] out? A: Yes. Court is now hearing from a new group of witnesses about the movements of a yacht early on New Years Day. This morning Watson trial lawyers applied to introduce new evidence to the Scott Watson trial in the Court of Appeal - the matter was not resolved and has been referred back to the High Court.

LIQUOR CHANGES: Predictions that new deaths on the road after drinking age changes. A guessing game for bar staff. Hotels expect younger drinkers will try it on. Under the new rules bottle stores will need to see a photo ID before they sell or face stiff penalties. 17-year-olds caught on licensed premises will also face instant fines. Dunedin policeman says it is an excellent step on the road to alcohol harm reduction. New laws will not be in force for at least another month.

LIQUOR CHANGES: Commissioner for Children says the reduction in the age is a death sentence for around 120 young people. The Health Ministry advised against it but the Health Minister voted for it. MPs told that when South Australia lowered the age it led to more road accidents and other problems. Wyatt Creech says statistics are being used by both sides.

LIQUOR CHANGES: History shows Kiwis have swallowed many changes in liquor laws. In wartime 1917 drinking times were restricted and the "six o'clock swill" began - 1960 wine in restaurants - 1967 six-o'clock closing ends - 1969 drinking age reduced from 21 to 20 - 1990 supermarkets allowed to sell wine.

FLASH FLOOD: Families of NZers involved in the adventure tourism disaster in Switzerland are on their way to the scene of the accident. Death toll believed to be 19. All bodies have not yet been found. Aussie PM John Howard says with 13 dead Australians it is probably the worst tragedy overseas ever for young Australians not in wartime.

FLASH FLOOD: Maramena Roderick Live: The victims were wearing wetsuits and had no identification on them. The bodies also swept down with trees. Some of the victims had severe head injuries. Swiss Police are extremely afraid of getting it wrong - they do not want to get names of the victims wrong. Australian authorities are pressuring the Swiss to release the names. Canyoning is now at a halt. Contiki tours has cancelled its tours in this area.

FLASH FLOOD: A New Zealand guide Jeff Clark said he left the canyoning company involved in the disaster because he was concerned about safety standards. The safety issue became too great an issue for me - he says. Clark claims that overtime safety standards at the operation fell after starting high at the beginning.

FLASH FLOOD: Canyoning is available in several New Zealand centres.

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