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National Radio Midday Bulletin

REST HOMES: A virus causing diarrhoea and vomiting has struck rest homes in the Waikato. The virus is highly contagious and health workers are asking infected people to stay at home.

TIMBERLANDS: The government has given Timberlands the green light to log beech forests on the West Coast commercially. The scheme will involve 25,000 trees per year. SOE Minister Tony Ryall says it is sustainable and ecologically friendly.

BANKS: New Zealand banks say they are not considering following WestpacTrust in charging 50 cents for customers using their card in another banks machines. However other banks say they cannot rule out the charges in the future.

QUAKE: More than 200,000 survivors of the Turkish quake have been living in the open despite heavy rain and ruptured drains and sewers.

WINEBOX: The government has asked for top level advice on the new findings of the Winebox inquiry.

…. Two stories missed due to phone ringing (sorry)…

MURDER: National MPs are considering whether to adopt as policy three different categories of murder as outlined in a private members bill from Brian Neeson – first degree if the murder is especially sadistic and two other categories. Sir Doug Graeme has concerns about the move coming from parliament.

DEPUTY MAYOR: The deputy mayor of Auckland invited journalists to his home this morning to outline what householders should be doing to prepare for the Y2K bug.

UNIONS AND APEC: Some unions are preparing to represent staff who are left bearing the brunt of not being requested to come to work during APEC. Some are being asked to take a day leave without pay and others asked to make up the hours.

CRICKET: Cricket may move out of Christchurch’s Jade Stadium (formerly Lancaster Park) in a move to have separate facilities for cricket and rugby. Cricket would move to the Village Green.

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