Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

The National Business Review – September 10

Timor War Threat - TVNZ Walkout Averted - Rambuka To Amnesty - POLL: Close The Winebox - And a Summary Of Analysis And Comment

The National Business Review – September 10

APEC: TIMOR WAR THREAT
The threat of war with Indonesia hangs over Apec as world leaders make it clear rapid military action involving New Zealand troops looms if the Indonesian government fails to rein in its maverick generals. While Foreign Affairs Minister Don McKinnon refused to spell out the level of New Zealand military involvement, up to 500 troops could be on their way to a war zone within days. Trade talks, now almost totally highjacked by the worsening East Timor crisis, fell into disarray yesterday.

APEC: TVNZ WALKOUT AVERTED
A staff walkout threatening Television New Zealand’s role as Apec host broadcaster was narrowly diverted on the eve of the summit. The Engineering Printing & Manufacturing Union and the Public Service Association said negotiations had broken down after months of lobbying for pay increases for their combined 300 members. Using the leverage of a major global event, the union with 180 staff in various jobs, including technical staff working on Apec coverage, had threatened to strike today.

RABUKA ADDRESSES AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
The leader of Fiji’s two military coups in 1987, Maj-Gen Sitiveni Rabuka, will present the inaugural address at Amnesty International’s Freedom Foundation dinner in Auckland on October 4. He will explain the motivation behind his illegal seizure of power and his decision to accept a non-racial constitution a decade later – a decision that ultimately cost him his job as prime minister.

OPINION POLL: CLOSE THE WINEBOX
Most people think it is time to shut the wine-box for good, the latest National Business Review-Compaq poll has found. Asked about the inquiry 58% said it was time to let the issue die, while 33% said the inquiry should be reopened. The survey was taken between August 26 and August 30, a week after the release of a High Court judicial review which overturned key findings of commission of inquiry head Sir Ronald Davison.
pricing.

ANALYSIS & COMMENT
Why Maori are poor – Law lecturer Mike Ross explains why the collective property culture fails to create wealth
Caretakers in charge – Political columnist Molesworth argues the government has gone into election mode with no one in control
Indonesia turns pariah state
Foreign policy analyst Stuart McMillan argues sanctions may prove last-resort weapon over an East Timor bloodbath
Economic historian Neville Bennett reveals how hedge fund speculators are targetting the enfeebled kiwi dollar
Economist Gareth Morgan urges curfew for teenagers to curb their nighttime bad behaviour

For further information: Nevil Gibson, Editor-in-Chief Ph 0-9-307 1629 or email editor@nbr.co.nz

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Commercial Scoop User? Help Scoop Survive (and Thrive!)

The ScoopPro licensing terms require that commercial users of Scoop.co.nz pay a reasonable fee in order to access the Scoop site so that this same information remains free and accessible to the wider public regardless of their disposable income. More>>

Joseph Cederwall: Building a Community Newsroom

A combination of new technology, ideas, institutions and business models and a renewed energy and commitment by the Scoop team, means Scoop aims to be at the forefront of the development of this renaissance that we term ‘News 3.0’. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop 3.0: Saving The News

Scoop Co-Founder Alastair Thompson - One of the saddest aspects of the decline of the news industry, not just here in NZ - but everywhere, is that it often seems invisible, in large part because news is a confidence business... More>>

ALSO:

UK Cabinet Backs Deal: Gordon Campbell On The Latest Roll Of The Brexit Dice

Brexit has left the British public looking like a nation of Wellington bus commuters. In both cases, the unholy mess bears no resemblance to what people were promised or the spin being used to justify it. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Democratic Leadership And Trump

On the big picture, the poll predictions were dead right. In the end, the Democratic Party won a clear victory in the House, and lost as expected in the Senate, where it had been defending at least 10 seats in regions that had voted heavily for Trump in 2016. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog