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Questions For Oral Answer - Wednesday, 9 February

Questions For Oral Answer - Wednesday, 9 February 2000

Question 1.

Rt Hon. Jenny Shipley to the Minister for Accident Insurance:

Q: Was the report the Prime Minister referred to yesterday in her answer to oral question No. 2 the Thomason-Burton report, which compared Canadian and United States public and private models of workers' compensation?

Question 2.

Damien O'Connor to the Minister of Fisheries:

Q: What independent reports has he received on the adequacy of research into the sustainability of New Zealand's fisheries?

Question 3.

Hon. Ken Shirley to the Minister for Accident Insurance:

Q: In view of the statement on Morning Report by the New Zealand Insurance Council that there has been a more than forty percent saving in workers' lives in the six months' experience of choice in accident insurance and the Associate Minister for Accident Insurance's statement to the effect that six months was too short a period to draw conclusions, why will the Government not delay the reversion to a State monopoly accident insurance system until we know whether choice in such insurance saves lives?

Question 4.

Peter Brown to the Minister of Corrections:

Q: Is he taking action to give effect to the overwhelming direction by 92% of voters to strengthen corrective measures for offenders; if so, what is that action?

Question 5.

Gerry Brownlee to the Minister for Accident Insurance:

Q: Further to the Prime Minister's comments alleging private insurers are loss leading, in response to oral question No. 2 yesterday, how does he explain that the Government's own insurer, @Work, has managed to report a significant profit on its activities?

Question 6.

Chris Carter to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade:

Q: What reports has he had on actions to bring to justice those responsible for human rights violations in East Timor?

Question 7.

Tony Ryall to the Minister for Broadcasting:

Q: What did she mean when she told the Listener, "Well, I suppose that the Government will not get as great a dividend ... but it's not going to say that. [The Government] is still going to hope for commercial success. I can't say to them [at TVNZ] that I expect no dividend because, if I do that, I wipe out $60 million from our books. I'm not free to do that."?

Question 8.

Nanaia Mahuta to the Associate Minister of Education (Tertiary Education):

Q: What action has he taken to reduce the costs of tertiary education for students?

Question 9.

Dr Nick Smith to the Minister of State Services:

Q: On what date was he told of the terms of resignation of the Vice-Chancellor of Victoria University, and by whom?

Question 10.

Sue Bradford to the Minister of Social Services and Employment:

Q: What measures is the Government taking to ensure that Community Employment is adequately carrying out its purpose of working with communities and groups to help create local opportunities for employment?

Question 11.

Rt Hon. Wyatt Creech to the Minister of Health:

Q: How has the cost for the disestablishment of the Health Funding Authority and its absorption into the Ministry of Health been calculated, to establish that the cost will be in the range of $3-$4 million, when her own paper to the Cabinet Business Committee warns that "Considerable uncertainty surrounds the net ongoing fiscal impact of the changes" and suggests they could be significantly higher?

Question 12.

Mark Peck to the Minister of Finance:

Q: What reports has he received on the state of New Zealand's external accounts?

Questions to Members

Question 1.

Hon. Ken Shirley to the Chairperson of the Committee on the Accident Insurance (Transitional Provisions) Bill:

Q: Has the committee decided how many of the submitters requesting to be heard by the committee will have an opportunity to present their evidence; if so, what is that number?

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