Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

Opinion: Upton-On-Line - Delicious Delegations


The Prime Minister has released the schedule of responsibilities that has been drawn up for the myriad Associate Ministers that this government has spawned. There are no fewer than 18 different ministers (out of an Executive of 26) running around associating themselves with other ministers. They span a mind-boggling 38 portfolios.

Some are sensible divisions of sprawling portfolios that benefit from the synergies that ministers with associated portfolios can provide. This category includes:

 Paul Swain (associating himself with elements of the energy and justice portfolios that link up with his commerce job)
 Jim Sutton (who looks after the trade negotiations aspects of foreign affairs & trade)
 Margaret Wilson (who looks after the constitutional and electoral elements of the justice portfolio that appropriately embellish a former law professor turned Attorney-General)

There’s the odd trouble shooting role moulded around the personal attributes of the minister in question. Trevor Mallard’s associate finance role is ominously described as “assisting the Minister with bilaterals conducted as part of the Budget process”.

Translated into the vernacular Albanian, this means cutting off the arms, legs and ears of unfortunate spending ministers in the pre-budget carnage that the Treasury sponsors each year as a way of staying within pre-agreed fiscal limits. Bill Birch personally savoured this role in the last government. It says something for Michael Cullen’s squeamishness that Trevor is to be hauled back from the gulag of chief executive terrorisation squads to impose fiscal discipline.

Then there are a raft of associations that are consolation prizes for those who didn’t make it through the cabinet door – Ruth Dyson handling replies to letters from embittered ACC claimants, Judith Tizard doing all the arts things Helen won’t have time to do as well as mysteriously “overseeing the Heart of the Nation”.

The biggest tranche is probably the ‘eye-over-the-shoulder’ associate roles that are there to ensure that coalition partners do not stray. These ones are invariably described as “No specific delegations – to be involved in general policy development”. They include:

 Pete Hodgson spying on Jim Anderton in economic development and regional development
 Phillida Bunkle spying on Marian Hobbs in environment, and
 Laila Harre spying on Margaret Wilson on behalf of the unions on labour

A bland series of delegations have Tariana Turia and Parekura Horomia tripping all over everyone as they involve themselves in “general policy development with particular regard to Maori”.

Finally, and most scandalously, there is the sprawling make-work scheme that has John Wright, the only Parliamentary Under-Secretary, involved in

 “general policy development – no specific delegations” on economic development, industry and regional development
 assisting in “aspects of the racing portfolio as they arise”, and – most implausibly –
 working with the revenue minister on the arcane complexities of child support policy, compliance and penalty issues and the proposed “General Inquiry” into taxation.

There will be so many people informing on one another and getting in the way of any decisions ever being taken that they will need to install temporary bunks and a fast food counter outside the cabinet committee room on the 8th floor of the beehive to accommodate the hundreds of officials that will have to be on hand to help these associate ministers argue with one another.

Last week we described the basic, Darwinian dynamics of the House in Question Time. As a result of popular demand we have decided to report weekly From the Plains of the Serengeti.

As we commented last week, the cast is still only coming into focus. But from upton-on-line’s binoculars the key players are already marked out. There is the plain dwelling, vegetarian herd led by Helen Clark and the carnivores at the top of the food chain led by Jenny Shipley. There are one or two big game hunters like Rodney Hide and Gerry Brownlee. And there are the scavengers led by Winston Peters. Mr Speaker appears to be a large, occasionally fierce and immovable object with thickened skin and ancient mien who has stumped the savannah over more years than any of the other animals can remember.

And yesterday (Wednesday) there was a visitor from outer space (or was it Westport) who rose in the Gallery facing the Speaker and declared her undying love for Winston Peters. The menagerie loved it and an embattled minister was saved from attack as mirth erupted.

There have been two notable predatory raids so far this week. The first, on Tuesday, involved the unfortunate Marian Hobbs. This amiable herbivore continues to attract a high level of interest. Her inability to pull the word ‘operational’ from her hard disc (leaving it to be supplied by helpful opposition members) had the government front bench grimacing. Yesterday they closed ranks, put their heads down and hid their injured colleague from the snipers.

The second incident involved a timid, forest margin dweller rarely sighted by observers. Sandra Lee found herself surrounded by an inquisitive pack as she tried to explain why her car had been impounded and its driver charged with a string of traffic offences. Never straying far from the watchful eye of the leader of the herd, she stuck to her lines about it being inappropriate to comment further while an investigation was under way.

As the list of responsibilities held by associate ministers shows, there is plenty of big game hunting in store!

http://www.arcadia.co.nz

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

New Reports: Flood Risk From Rain And Sea Under Climate Change

One report looks at what would happen when rivers are flooded by heavy rain and storms, while the other examines flooding exposure in coastal and harbour areas and how that might change with sea-level rise.

Their findings show that across the country almost 700,000 people and 411,516 buildings worth $135 billion are presently exposed to river flooding in the event of extreme weather events...

There is near certainty that the sea will rise 20-30 cm by 2040. By the end of the century, depending on whether global greenhouse gas emissions are reduced, it could rise by between 0.5 to 1.1 m, which could add an additional 116,000 people exposed to extreme coastal storm flooding. More>>

ALSO:

 
 

Gordon Campbell: On The Commerce Commission Fuel Report

The interim Commerce Commission report on the fuel industry will do nothing to endear the major oil companies to the New Zealand public... More>>

ALSO:

Emergency Govt Bill: Overriding Local Licensing For The Rugby

“It’s pretty clear some clubs are having difficulty persuading their district licensing committees to grant a special licence to extend their hours for this obviously special event, and so it makes sense for Parliament to allow clubs to meet a community desire." More>>

ALSO:

Leaving Contract Early: KiwiBuild Programme Losing Another Top Boss

Ms O'Sullivan began a six-month contract as head of KiwiBuild Commercial in February, but the Housing Ministry has confirmed she has resigned and will depart a month early to take up a new job. More>>

ALSO:

Proposed National Policy Statement: Helping Our Cities Grow Up And Out

“We need a new approach to planning that allows our cities to grow up, especially in city centres and around transport connections. We also have to allow cities to expand in a way that protects our special heritage areas, the natural environment and highly productive land." More>>

ALSO:

Ombudsman's Report: Ngāpuhi Elder 'Shocked' By Conditions At Ngawha Prison

A prominent Ngāpuhi elder is shocked to find inmates at Ngawha Prison are denied water and forced to relieve themselves in the exercise yard... Chief Ombudsman Peter Boshier has released a report highly critical of conditions at the Northland prison. More>>

ALSO:

Promises: Independent Election Policy Costing Unit A Step Closer

The creation of an entity to provide political parties with independent and non-partisan policy costings is a step closer today, according to Finance Minister Grant Robertson and Associate Finance Minister James Shaw. More>>

ALSO:

School's In: Primary And Intermediate Principals Accept New Offer

Primary and intermediate school principals have voted to accept a new settlement from the Ministry of Education, which includes entrenched pay parity with secondary principals. More>>

ALSO:

IPCA On 'Rawshark' Investigation: Multiple Police Failings In Hager Searches Confirmed

The Independent Police Conduct Authority has found that the Police's unlawful search of Nicky Hager's property in October 2014 resulted from an unwitting neglect of duty and did not amount to misconduct by any individual officer... More>>

ALSO:

Broadcasting Standards: Decisions On Coverage Of Mosque Attacks

The Authority upheld one of these complaints, finding that the use of extensive excerpts from the alleged attacker’s livestream video on Sky News New Zealand had the potential to cause significant distress to audiences in New Zealand, and particularly to the family and friends of victims, and the wider Muslim community. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels