Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

"Bio-What?" Launched - With Executive Summary

Media Release
Hon Marian Hobbs
Minister for the Environment

9 March 2000
"BIO-WHAT?" LAUNCHED


The diversity of creatures and plants with which we share our country are an important part of what makes New Zealand New Zealand, the Minister for the Environment, Marian Hobbs, said today.

Announcing the launch of the preliminary report of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on biodiversity and private land, Ms Hobbs said landowners have a critical role to play in maintaining New Zealand’s native plants and animals.

“Landowners and their communities cannot be required to act with public spirit and generosity but we cannot achieve our biodiversity goals without them,” she said.

A committee consisting of former Federated Farmers President, John Kneebone (Chair), lawyer, Mark Christensen, Ecologist, Dr Judith Roper-Lindsay, and farmer and conservationist, Kevin Prime, compiled the report.

Entitled "Bio-What?" the report recommends developing a national accord on biodiversity between key parties with a focused national policy statement under the Resource Management Act to define roles and establish a methodology for local government.

It also recommends a suite of non-statutory guidance and greater government assistance with information, research and incentive schemes to help councils apply the national policy statement and to support local measures and local communities.

“Halting the decline in New Zealand’s biodiversity will not be achieved through forced compliance nor from increased public funding alone," Ms Hobbs said.

“We need private landowners who understand and accept the importance of this issue, and we need to encourage and assist them to make the right decisions.

“The advisory committee has offered its view on a general approach to the issue. Now its time to hear from others.”

The Advisory Committee will receive submissions on the preliminary report until 16 June, 2000.

RELEASE ENDS

MORE INFO:

Bio-what?

Preliminary report of the Ministerial Advisory Committee addressing the effects of private land management on indigenous biodiversity.
Executive summary

New Zealand’s and New Zealanders’ interests in biodiversity are diverse. Biodiversity - a term which has entered common usage to refer to the diversity of plants and animals, and the places they live – contributes to our sense of national identity, provides ecosystem services upon which we all depend, is culturally important and defines our sense of place, and is valued by many as an expression of life itself. After evolving in isolation and becoming distinctively ‘different’, New Zealand’s indigenous biodiversity is in steep decline under pressure from human activity and introduced plants and animals.

This document sets out the discussion of a Ministerial Advisory Committee established in early 1999 to consider ways to sustain indigenous biodiversity on private land. It looks at ways we can better care for our native plants and animals, and the places they live, and recognises the special challenges posed by that goal.

Seven principles underpin the approach proposed. These are:
 sustaining biodiversity on private land relies on the individual commitment of land owners and managers;
 Maori have a distinct relationship to biodiversity and
 sustaining biodiversity requires a strategic approach;
 effectively sustaining biodiversity requires co-ordination and collaboration;
 there is a need for active management;
 those with responsibilities for biodiversity have variable capacity to respond;
 we need to take a learning approach.

The overall approach proposed by the Committee involves establishing a national goal, clarifying roles and responsibilities and providing the guidance, support and flexibility for local solutions.

To implement the approach the Committee recommends:
 the development of an accord between key parties at a national level, as a first step to recognising differing perspectives and common concerns;
 a focused national policy statement (NPS), which defines roles and establishes a methodology that local government should follow;
 a suite of non-statutory guidance to assist councils to apply the NPS;
 additional Crown actions (such as the provision of information, research and incentive schemes) to support local measures;
 assistance to local communities with the development of local accords.

Specifically, the Committee suggests that the Crown facilitate the development of a national biodiversity accord, to be known as the New Zealand Accord on Biodiversity and Land Management. The accord would seek agreement on the following matters:
 the status of the accord;
 the importance and decline of New Zealand’s biodiversity;
 the rights and responsibilities of stakeholders;
 how to manage for biodiversity;
 recognition of the differing priorities and capacities of signatories;
 recognition of the lack of information on, and public awareness of, biodiversity;
 recognition of the need for resources;
 a common goal and
 implementation of the accord.

The Committee proposes development of a second biodiversity accord, to be known as the Aotearoa Accord on Biodiversity and Land Management. This Accord - or reaffirmation – would be focused on the relationship between Maori and their Treaty partner, the Crown. The Accord would also acknowledge the significance of Matauranga Maori (Maori traditional knowledge), and Maori’s :
 unique world-view of biodiversity
 relationship with Wahi Tapu
 status as kaitiaki and
 traditional management approaches to biodiversity.

The Committee believes that the value of the two national Accords could be greatly enhanced if they led to specific and detailed local agreements, which would give effect to the broad understandings reached at the national level. Local accords can also apply the general national agreements while recognising local conditions and local issues.

A National Policy Statement (NPS) under the Resource Management Act could usefully provide a clearer and more specific regulatory framework within which a range of regulatory and non-regulatory initiatives should take place. It would deal with the effects of land use on biodiversity (whether terrestrial, aquatic or marine).

The committee suggests that the National Policy Statement could cover the following four matters:
 a national objective
 a requirement to take action
 a methodology for regional councils to select objectives, policies and methods
 an outline of matters that should be monitored.

The Committee considers that additional guidance will be needed to ensure that people can work more effectively in the interests of better outcomes for biodiversity. The guidance would target those exercising functions and powers under the Act, assisting them as to how the NPS should be applied. This guidance would also be available to the general public and interest groups, to indicate how they could act in accordance with the intentions of the policy statement.

The Committee recognises that, ultimately, achieving New Zealand’s and New Zealanders’ goals for biodiversity will result not from forced compliance or from increased public funding alone. Outside public conservation areas it also depends largely on understanding, acceptance and informed decision-making by individuals, companies and regulatory and non-regulatory public agencies. It will take the combined resources and the co-operation of all these to halt the decline in New Zealand’s biodiversity.

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Crowdsale And Crowdfunding Campaign: Help Create The Future Of Independent News

Two weeks to go! The Scoop 3.0 plan aims to create NZ’s first community-owned, distributed news and media intelligence ecosystem in 2019. We believe this ScoopPro media monetisation approach can be scaled and spread globally to support local and independent news efforts in regional New Zealand and around the world.

Scoop is an ecosystem, it would not exist without those who contribute to it, read it and rely on it for professional media purposes. Generous past support from this ecosystem has enabled us to come this far in developing our business model. Support our PledgeMe Campaign>>

 

14/11: Two Years’ Progress Since The Kaikoura Earthquake

Mayor John Leggett said it was a day for reflection, but also a time to recognise the work by many people to support progress towards recovery made across Marlborough since November 2016. More>>

ALSO:

Pike River: Mine Drift Re-Entry Plan To Proceed

“I’ve decided the Te Kāhui Whakamana Rua Tekau Mā Iwa - Pike River Recovery Agency, recommended course of action to enter the drift, using the existing access tunnel, is by far the safest option,” said Andrew Little. More>>

ALSO:

Appointments: New High Commissioner To Australia Announced

“Dame Annette King needs no introduction given her long running career as a parliamentarian where she has previously held a number senior Cabinet portfolios, including Justice, Police and Health. She also was Parliament’s longest serving female MP with 30 years’ service,” said Mr Peters. More>>

ALSO:

Two Years Since Kaikoura: Silvia Cartwright To Lead Inquiry Into EQC

“The inquiry will be the first of its kind under the Public Inquiries Act 2013 and will have all the powers of a Royal Commission, be independent of Government and make its report directly to the Governor-General. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Royal Commission Into Child Abuse

Obviously, it is good news that the coalition government has broadened the scope of its Royal Commission into the abuse of children, beyond its previous focus on children in state care. More>>

ALSO:

Cases Delayed: Court Staff Refuse To Handle Sentencing Papers

Dozens of court cases have reportedly been delayed, as court staff escalate industrial action at two Auckland courts by enforcing a ban on handling sentencing papers. More>>

ALSO:

Education: Primary Teachers Rolling Strikes

RNZ Report: More than 100,000 primary school students in Auckland will be home from school today as teachers and principals walk off the job for the second time this year. It's the start of a week of rolling one-day strikes around the country, after the collapse of contract negotiations last Thursday. More>>

ALSO:

"Process Was Sound": Inquiry Into Haumaha Appointment Released

The Inquiry’s purpose was to examine, identify, and report on the adequacy of the process that led to the appointment. It found the process was sound and no available relevant information was omitted. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels