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Q & A - Torere Home Building Project

Q1. Who is funding this project?
A1: Ngaitai Iwi, Habitat for Humanity and the Housing Corporation are contributing the funds for this project. The Housing Corporation is contributing $800,000, Habitat for Humanity $400,000, and Ngaitai Iwi $200,000.

Q2: What does the project consist of?
A2: Twenty houses are being built in and around Torere on papakainga (Maori owned land) at an average of $70,000 per house. These houses are being built for Ngaitai Iwi families.

Q3: Why are the houses being built in this location?
A3: Ngaitai Iwi and Habitat Humanity formed a joint venture with the objective of eradicating substandard housing in the Ngaitai Iwi rohe. In conjunction with Pacific Health: Toi Te Ora they identified a housing need in the region and the families of greatest need. Ngaitai Iwi and Habitat for Humanity then jointly lobbied government and came up with a workable proposal.

Q4: Why is the government supporting this initiative?
A4: A key government objective is to close the disparity gaps between Maori and Pakeha and making sure decent, affordable housing is available is a key way of achieving this outcome.

Q5: Who is Habitat for Humanity?
A5: An international non-profit organisation dedicated to eliminating poverty housing worldwide. This is achieved by building simple, decent homes for families in need, sold on a no-profit, no interest basis. Donations of cash and materials and volunteer labour enable projects such as Torere to happen.

Q6: Why is Habitat for Humanity involved with the Torere project?
A6: Firstly, because it is part of their global vision to eliminate sub-standard housing. On a national level Habitat is keen to meet specific needs in regards to Maori housing. Torere is a pilot project in a defined area. This project will eradicate sub-standard housing from this geographical area. It is envisaged that this will be a successful model for replication.



Q7: Which government agencies/bodies are involved with this project?
A7: Te Puni Kokiri, Ministry of Social Policy, Housing Corporation of New Zealand.

Q8: Who will carry out construction?
A8: The construction will be carried out by the Iwi as a whanau self-build. Participants will receive on-site training and will use skills gained from courses attended at technical colleges. Habitat for Humanity will also be providing volunteers.

Q9: Why are the Iwi carrying out construction?
A9: Firstly, the model requires the involvement of recipient families in the construction of their home. Secondly, work on this project carried out by Iwi augments the capital required for the project. Thirdly, the undertaking of this project enables the development of administration and construction skills amongst the Iwi with the aim of increasing employment opportunities.

Q10: What is the involvement of the Districts Credit Union in this project?
A10: The Districts Credit Union will supply budgeting assistance and be a conduit for project repayments for whanau. The Union will assist the whanau with their savings plans to achieve the required deposits.

Q11: When will construction commence?
A11: Mark Gosche, the Minister of Housing launches the project on 22 September 2000. Ten houses will be built by 30 June 2001.

Q12: Who are the contacts for further information?
A12: Grant Cathro, Executive Director, Habitat for Humanity,
Ph: 09 529 4111
John Hayes, Ngaitai Iwi Authority, Ph: 07 315 8485
Richard Matthews, Business Development Manager, Housing Corporation, Ph: 04 4601 831

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