Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

Funding For Implementing Family Violence Guideline

2 November 2000

Funding For Implementing Family Violence Guidelines - Annette King

Health Minister Annette King says she is delighted the Cabinet has allocated $2.8 million in new funding to develop and implement guidelines to reduce child abuse and family violence.

Mrs King argued for the funding some weeks ago, and it has now been approved as part of the Government's response to a report, produced by former police commissioner Peter Doone, on combating and preventing Maori crime.

Mrs King said: "We are demystifying the issue of child abuse and family violence by getting it out in the open and by giving health practitioners the tools they need to deal with this problem and stop the rising tide.

"Educating and supporting health professionals is more appropriate than requiring mandatory reporting. It is essential health professionals feel confident that they can identify abuse, and know where to turn to for assistance."

Mrs King said the funding would be used in three main areas, protocol development, training development programmes and the delivery of training programmes and public health campaigns.

"There have been several cases recently reported in the media highlighting the inadequacies in the current system for identifying and following up on suspected child abuse. Health professionals can make a key contribution in reducing family violence and abuse through prevention strategies and improved identification of and response to those experiencing family violence.

"Many health professionals do not have the protocols or training to deal adequately with these issues, and have been reluctant to refer suspected cases for fear they may be breaching patient confidentiality or privacy and because of ethical concerns. The Ministry of Health and Child Youth and Family have been working with the College of GPs to develop procedures for general practices and these are expected to be ready for implementation this year."

Mrs King said this initiative would bring the area of child abuse into the wider context of family and whanau violence so neither perpetrators and sufferers "felt as embarrassed to discuss their situation with a health practitioner. If we give practitioners a better understanding of the clinical picture of abuse it will give them confidence asking questions without alienating or embarrassing patients.

"GPs and health professionals ask about and deal with personal and private issues on a daily basis. Some are more private than violence, and most people are pleased to have the opportunity to talk. Family violence is an issue that needs to be talked about, so that it is no longer a taboo subject, and sufferers don't continue to feel powerless.

"To achieve this doctors and other health professionals need to be prepared so they can help their patients. They need to be educated and supported through robust structures and programmes so they are not afraid or uneasy asking questions, and so they know what to do should violence and abuse be disclosed or suspected.

"We might expect notifications of suspected abuse to increase as doctors become more confidence at detecting suspected family violence, but inappropriate notifications should decrease. It should also help identify children who are not abused but need support from Well Child providers and community service agencies."


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The New Pike River Agency (And The Air Strike Wing)

Much of the sympathy the public still feels for the families of the Pike River miners has been sustained by the sense that the previous government – let alone the mining company and the processes of receivership and litigation – has never dealt honestly, or fairly, with them.

Finally, yesterday’s announcement by the Ardern government that a new state agency will be set up to assess and plan the manned re-entry to the mine (on a set timetable) goes a long way to meeting the families’ remaining request: that they be enabled, if at all possible, to bury their loved ones. More>>

 

Not Going Swimmingly: Contractor Cut, New Dates For Christchurch Sports Centre

“As an incoming Minister, I have been conducting a thorough review of progress on the Anchor projects and to learn of a $75 million budget blowout on this project was very disappointing..." More>>

ALSO:

Tertiary: Allowances, Loan Living Costs To Get Boost

“From 1 January, student allowance base rates and the maximum amount students can borrow for living costs will rise by a net $50 a week,” says Education Minister Chris Hipkins... further adjusted from 1 April 2018 in line with any increase in the CPI. More>>

ALSO:

Foreign Affairs: Patrick Gower Interviews Jacinda Ardern

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says discussions have already begun on how to bring climate change refugees into New Zealand under a Pacific seasonal employment plan... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Centre Right’s Love Of ‘Nanny State’

You’d almost think it was 2005 again. That was a time when the rugged individualists of the centre-right were being beset by government regulations on the nature of light-bulbs, the size of shower heads, the junk food available at school tuck shops and other such essentials... More>>

Speaking Of Transport: Public Engagement On Wellington Scenarios

“Our work on possible solutions for Wellington’s transport future is ongoing, but has progressed to the stage where we’re ready to share our ideas with the public and seek their feedback to help guide our next steps...” More>>

ALSO:

Parental Leave: National's Time-Sharing Change Fails

National has proposed a change to the Parental Leave and Employment Protection Amendment Bill that would allow both parents to take paid parental leave at the same time, if that is what suits them best. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election