Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

Ngai Tahu Presentation, Grand Hall - Horomia

SPEECH FOR HON PAREKURA HOROMIA
NGAI TAHU PRESENTATION, GRAND HALL
9 MAY 2001


I am honoured to host this function, which has brought the entire board of Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu back to Parliament for the first time since the settlement of the Ngai Tahu Claim.

As Minister of Maori Affairs, my job is to be a strong voice for Maori at the Cabinet table and to accelerate Maori development. I, like most of us, want to see Maori participating actively in growing the economy and we want to take the lead in strengthening the cultural and social fabric of Aotearoa. Only then can Maori be actively involved in building the nation. I note the similarities this approach has with the Runanga's vision of:

"A future where Ngai Tahu whanui will have the opportunity to protect and enhance their spiritual, cultural, educational and economic aspirations in a setting of excellence."

It has been nearly six years since Ngai Tahu and the Crown reached agreement on all the significant issues necessary to conclude a settlement of the Ngai Tahu Claim. The passage of the Runanga o Ngai Tahu Act in 1996 has enabled Ngai Tahu to coordinate its business, cultural and political activities as it saw fit.

There have been numerous cultural and economic benefits since that time. Only this week I received a media release to say that the Shotover Jet company has appointed a new Chief Executive. Ngai Tahu is the major shareholder in this significant tourist operation.

Since the signing, Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu has exponentially increased its asset base, turnover and net worth. I am sure that the Poua and Taua of 1848 would be delighted to learn that Ngai Tahu has been restored to its pre Treaty of Waitangi status as being the largest landowner in its ancestral homeland, Te Wai Pounamu.



I am heartened that Ngai Tahu is looking toward the future to ensure the success continues. I am impressed that the tribe has developed a 25 year strategic plan and set its cultural and economic direction for the future. The strategy named "Kotahi Mano Kaika, Kotahi Mano Wawata" - A thousand homes, a thousand dreams, reflects the fullness of diversity.

Last year, I attended the launch of the Ngai Tahu Puna Reo, The puna will become a hub for Ngai Tahu language regeneration and a key link between Maori communities and Government education and Maori language initiatives in Te Waipounamu. I was saddened to hear that less than one percent of Ngai Tahu speak Ngai Tahu reo. That makes your reo very precious indeed. It's never too late to start work to regenerate reo and tikanga, we just have to start.You are prepared to do your bit, you expect the government to do it's bit. It is a partnership that continues to evolve.

Your return to Parliament is an example of partnership in action. It is important that we understand the practice of inclusiveness, both about Maori people and with other partners who can move things forward. Serious and long-term progress can only be made when we work together.

Ngai Tahu is making positive progress. I think you are an example of how iwi walk the fine line of cultural integrity, social improvement and economic success. Iwi politics is tough. Sometimes your own are your harshest critics. To do it, you need vision, resources, good people and tough skin. But it is worth it because you are building the future for your descendants.

I am delighted to welcome Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu here. Everyone in the room is looking forward to an update on your progress.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Joseph Cederwall: The End Of ‘Objectivity’ In Journalism

... and the dawn of something much better?
2019 looks like it might well be another really bad, terrible, not so good year for the traditional journalism model globally. Already in January three leading US digital outlets—BuzzFeed, the Huffington Post, and Vice announced layoffs that have left many accomplished journalists unemployed. Consolidation of journalism looks set to continue unabated as larger (sharky) media conglomerates swallow up smaller players globally. We also appear to be witnessing the death throes of the concept of ‘objective’ truth in journalism. However, perhaps that is not at all as bad as it sounds, and we are just finally waking up to the reality that it never really existed in the first place... More>>

 
 

Environment: Government To End Tenure Review

“Tenure review has resulted in parcels of land being added to the conservation estate, but it has also resulted in more intensive farming and subdivision on the 353,000 ha of land which has been freeholded. This contributed to major landscape change and loss of habitat for native plants and animals,” said Eugenie Sage. More>>

ALSO:

Bell Tolls: Big Changes, Grand Mergers Planned For Vocational Training

“At a time when we’re facing critical skill shortages, too many of our polytechnics and institutes of technology are going broke... More>>

ALSO:

Sallies' State Of The Nation: Progress Stalled In Reducing Inequality

The report shows a lack of tangible progress in key areas including record levels of household debt and a growing gap in educational achievement between poorer and more well off communities. More>>

ALSO:

Party Politics In Tax Morale Survey: SSC To Seek Answers From IRD

Minister of State Services Chris Hipkins has today asked the State Services Commissioner Peter Hughes to examine IRD’s reported inappropriate use of a public survey. More>>

ALSO:

Health: Prohibiting Smoking In Vehicles Carrying Children

Under the change, Police will be able to require people to stop smoking in their cars if children (under 18) are present. Police will also be able to use their discretion to give warnings, refer people to stop-smoking support services, or issue an infringement fee of $50... It is expected that this amendment will become law by the end of 2019. More>>

ALSO:

Waitangi Day: Nationwide Events Commemorate Treaty Signing

“From large-scale events attracting tens of thousands of people such as those at Hoani Waititi Marae in Auckland and the Porirua Waterfront, to smaller gatherings in areas as far flung as the Chatham Islands and to the significant commemorations at Waitangi, these events are an opportunity for us to reflect on the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.” More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels