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Launch Of Te Ahi Kaa Roa - Horomia Speech

Hon Parekura Horomia Speech

Launch Of Te Ahi Kaa Roa (The Puao Te Atatu A Tuhoe Trust)

Tenei te mihi ki a koutou katoa, Tuhoe Whanui – tena koutou, tena koutou, tena koutou katoa.

It is good to be here. I want to congratulate you all for your contribution to today. I know it has been a long hard road and as with all partnerships, compromises have had to be made along the way. That is the secret to a successful partnership. To give and take for the betterment of the people involved.

The seeds of today were planted more than a decade ago. In July 1986 John Te Rangianiwaniwa Rangihau as Chairman of the Mäori Perspective Advisory Committee presented the report Puao te atatu to the then Minister of Social Welfare, Hon Ann Hercus.

In that report, recommendation thirteen proposed ‘immediate action be taken to address the cultural, economic and social problems which are creating serious tensions in our major cities and in certain outlying areas’.

Time has passed and governments have been slow in taking up the challenge laid down by Te Rangihau and others. But with this initiative, this government is seeking to take action on that recommendation presented 15 years ago.

This coalition Government is committed to creating opportunities for whanau, hapü, iwi and other Mäori communities to participate in their own development. We want people to plan, direct, control and co-ordinate efforts across local and central government, tribal authorities and structures, other cultural structures, the business community and Mäori communities.

This government is committed to supporting ‘bottom up’ approaches tailored to meet local need. It is about harnessing all of the resources to move our communities and therefore our country forward.

This partnership between Puao Te Ata Tu a Tuhoe and the Government is an opportunity to test innovative ideas. It is an opportunity for government to support a unique way for working with Maori.

This initiative has shown government agencies do not have to control the development process but they can support community decisions to do things your way.

Puao Te Ata Tu a Tuhoe is the trust that will run Te Ahi Kaa roa. Te Ahi Kaa Roa is about setting up and developing centres of knowledge to enable an integrated approach to service delivery. What does that mean? There will be five sites where two-way relationships will operate between government agencies and the community. Te Ahi Kaa Roa will not deliver the services of government agencies, but it will facilitate, coordinate and advocate on behalf of the agencies and community people.

Within Tuhoe, you have the abilities, the skills and the expertise to plan, control, manage and implement any initiatives you consider will bring about positive changes to your communities.

Community development is about –
 working together as equals and
 putting people's ideas and initiatives into action.

It demands a huge amount of time, work, effort and support from whanau, hapu and iwi. Some may think that the hard work is over - now that the funding has been approved and a contract has been entered into between yourselves and the Government, via Te Puni Kökiri.

I am aware though that the real work is only beginning. Your project Te Ahi Kaa Roa will continue to be challenging, demanding and frustrating. It will demand that you continue the dialogue you have developed but it will also have its own rewards and benefits.

This is a prime opportunity to enhance and develop potential leaders within Tuhoe and to increase the community capacity to develop those leaders.

Future leaders need to be developed and nurtured within our whanau, hapü and iwi so that they can continue with the work of past and current leaders - to build upon the foundations that have been laid.

I envisage a future for Mäori where we can state proudly who we are and determine where we want to go.

I want to see us not only doing things we are already good at, but also trying things that we haven't tried before. You and your project are a great example of that.

My colleague, Hon Tariana Turia and I are pleased to officially launch this initiative – Te Ahi Kaa Roa – strengthening the home base in the rohe of Tuhoe.

 Mihi

 It has been a long hard road and, as with all partnerships, compromises have had to be made along the way.

 The secret to a successful partnership is to give and take for the betterment of the people involved.

 The seeds of today were planted more than a decade ago.

 In July 1986 John Rangihau presented the report Puao te atatu to the then Minister of Social Welfare, Hon Ann Hercus.

 The report recommended that

‘immediate action be taken to address the cultural, economic and social problems which are creating serious tensions in our major cities and in certain outlying areas’.

 Governments have been slow in taking up the challenge.

 But with this initiative, this government is acting on that recommendation of 15 years ago.

 This Government wants to create opportunities for whanau, hapü, iwi and other Mäori communities to participate in their own development.

 This government is committed to supporting ‘bottom up’ approaches.

 It is about using all resources better to move our communities, and our country, forward.

 This partnership between Puao Te Ata Tu a Tuhoe and the Government is a chance to test innovative ideas.

 It is an opportunity for government to support a unique way for working with Maori.

 Government agencies do not have to control the development process - they can support community decisions to do things your way.

 Puao Te Ata Tu a Tuhoe is the trust that will run Te Ahi Kaa roa.

 Te Ahi Kaa Roa will set up five sites where two-way relationships operate between government agencies and the community.

 Te Ahi Kaa Roa will not deliver the services of government agencies.

 It will facilitate, coordinate and advocate on behalf of the agencies and community people.

 Within Tuhoe, there are the skills and the expertise to plan, control, manage and implement any initiatives you want to run.

 Community development is about –

 working together as equals and

 putting people's ideas and initiatives into action.

 Some may think that the hard work is over - now that the funding has been approved and a contract has been signed.

 I think that the real work is only beginning.

 Your project will continue to be challenging, demanding and frustrating but it will have its rewards and benefits.

 This is a prime opportunity to enhance and develop potential leaders within Tuhoe.

 And to increase the community capacity to develop those leaders.

 Future leaders need to be developed and nurtured within our whanau, hapü and iwi.

 That way they can continue with the work of past and current leaders - to build upon the foundations that have been laid.

 I envisage a future for Mäori where we can state proudly who we are and determine where we want to go.

 I want to see us not only doing things we are already good at, but also trying things that we haven't tried before.

 You and your project are a great example of that.

 Tariana and I are pleased to officially launch this initiative – Te Ahi Kaa Roa – strengthening the home base in the rohe of Tuhoe.

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