Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

Progress Being Made On New Zealand Health Strategy

Health Minister Annette King today tabled the first annual report outlining progress on the implementation of the New Zealand Health Strategy.

"My report notes the many plans and initiatives that are in place to improve the health of New Zealanders but also acknowledges that there are many areas for improvement."

The New Zealand Health Strategy has 61 population health objectives, and the report focuses on the progress made in implementing 13 of them. These are: smoking, nutrition, obesity, physical activity, suicide, alcohol and other drug use, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, oral health, interpersonal violence, severe mental illness, and child health care services.

The report, Implementing the New Zealand Health Strategy 2001, also looks at improved service priorities in public health, primary health care, waiting times for elective services in public hospitals, improved responsiveness of mental health services, and services for people in rural areas. Attention is also given to progress in reducing inequalities, particularly in relation to Maori and Pacific people, and those in lower socio-economic groups.

The release of toolkits providing practical advice for District Health Boards and others; the value of the nicotine replacement and Quitline programmes; and the growing level of support by GPs for the Green Prescription Scheme were among the developments highlighted.

Other achievements include the expansion of child and youth mental health services; the pilot programmes being run in Northland to develop and implement strategies to reduce alcohol-related harm in Maori communities; and the availability of free annual checks for people with diabetes.

Mrs King noted that concern remains about the high prevalence of tobacco use for Maori and for Pacific peoples, against an overall reduction in cigarette consumption; the need for comprehensive suicide prevention action across a range of government and community sectors and the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes.

"Providing a high-quality health service always involves trade-offs between an unlimited demand for services and our limited resources.

"If we can focus on priority requirements we are more likely to make progress in the areas where we will see the most benefits. I have asked District Health Boards to focus on seven priorities in the New Zealand Health Strategy over the next 18 months."

These priorities are the implementation of the Maori Health Strategy, Primary Health Care Strategy, elective services policy, New Zealand Disability Strategy and the Mental Health Blueprint as well as addressing diabetes and reducing inequalities.

The report does not cover a full year because District Health Boards only got underway during the year. Some initiatives are included that have been under way for some time and are having an impact on the priority population health objectives. The report also provides a framework for reporting in 2002 and subsequent years.

Under the Public Health & Disability Act 2000, the Minister is required to table a report on the progress towards implementation of the New Zealand Health Strategy in the House by the end of each year.

A full copy of Implementing the New Zealand Health Strategy 2001 is available on the Ministry of Health’s website www.moh.govt.nz


Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Charlotte Graham: Empowering Communities To Act In A Disaster

The year of record-breaking natural disasters means that in the US, as in New Zealand, there’s a conversation happening about how best to run the emergency management sector and what philosophies best engage and protect communities in the event of a crisis.

How much of the responsibility for a community’s safety in a natural disaster is the Government’s, and how much can be left up to the community themselves? And how do we ensure none of our most vulnerable residents are left behind? More>>

 

CPAG Report: The Further Fraying Of The Welfare Safety Net

New Zealand’s welfare system has undergone a major transformation during the past three decades. This process has seriously thwarted the original intent of the system, which was to provide a decent standard of living for all New Zealanders in times of need... More>>

ALSO:

Signage, Rumble Strips, Barriers: Boost For State Highway Road Safety

Boost for road safety this summer Associate Transport Minister Julie Anne Genter today announced a short term boost in road safety funding this summer and signalled a renewed focus from the Government on introducing safer speed limits. More>>

ALSO:

Risks & Adaptation: Cheaper To Cut Emissions Than Deal With Climate Change

The cost of climate change to New Zealand is still unknown, but a group of experts tasked with plugging the country's information gaps says it will likely be significant and it would be cheaper to cut greenhouse emissions than simply adapting to those changes. More>>

ALSO:

BPS HYEFU WYSIWYG: Labour's Budget Plans, Families Package

“Today we are announcing the full details of the Government’s Families Package. This is paid for by rejecting National’s tax cuts and instead targeting spending at those who need it most. It will lift 88,000 children out of poverty by 2021." More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages