Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Television violence research project confirmed

9 December 2002 Media Statement

Television violence research project confirmed

Broadcasting Minister Steve Maharey and Green MP Sue Kedgley today met with the working group appointed to oversee new research into violence on television.

The research project will look at the portrayal of violence on our television, examine international research for information which could be relevant in this country and evaluate the public policy tools available to control the level and nature of violence on television in New Zealand. The study results from a Green Party initiative to investigate violence on television, for which $300,000 was negotiated during the 2002 Budget. As part of the cooperation agreement between the government and the Greens the project will continue.

Steve Maharey said the depiction and incidence of violence on television continues to be an issue of concern to New Zealanders.

“Many New Zealanders are concerned about the level and nature of violence on television. Parents, in particular, worry about the consequences for their children of viewing violent programming.

“The research project will look at the international evidence on the effects of exposure to television violence, what is being broadcast on our screens and advise whether there is any further cause for concern.

“Importantly the study will also evaluate the tools available in New Zealand to control the level and nature of violence on television - the Broadcasting Standards Authority, the Broadcasting Act 1989, codes of practice and the TVNZ Charter - and see how these stack up with responses in other countries.

“The government has appointed a nine-member working group made of broadcasters, programme makers, consumer advocates and academics to select and oversee the researchers who will carry out the study. The researchers will report through the working group to me in September 2003,” Steve Maharey said.

Sarah Aitchison, Manager Stakeholder Communications, Ministry of Culture and Heritage, e-mail: sarah.aitchison@mch.govt.nz.

Attached are details of the Project Group membership and its terms of reference.

Television Violence Project Working Group membership

Dr Rajan Prasad (chair) is an Associate Professor of social work and social policy at Massey University. His research into families led to the establishment of the social workers in schools programme. Dr Prasad served as Race Relations Conciliator between1996-2001.

The chief executives of Television New Zealand Ian Fraser and TV3 Rick Friesen.

Dr Max Abbott is Dean of Health Studies at Auckland University of Technology and Deputy Chairperson of Waitemata District Health Board. He was previously the Director of the Mental Health Foundation and led earlier research into television violence in New Zealand.

John Terris, spokesperson for Viewers for Television Excellence and Mayor of Hutt City, and Jane Parker, a member of the Children’s Television Foundation, will represent advocacy organisations.

Dr Trisha Dunleavy is a senior lecturer and programme director in media studies at Victoria University of Wellington. She is one of New Zealand’s leading researchers into television issues.

Jane Wrightson is chief executive of the Screen Production and Development Association (SPADA) and will represent programme makers.

Professor Judy McGregor is head of Massey University’s Communication and Journalism Department and was recently appointed as the country’s first Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner. She will represent the Broadcasting Standards Authority, which she has been a member of since 2000.

Television Violence Project Working Group Terms of Reference

The task of the working group is

- to commission a literature search to establish the latest international research findings on:

i. definitions of television violence;

ii. methods of measuring the incidence of television violence; and

iii. any links that have been identified between television violence and social behaviour;

- to evaluate this research, with reference to the New Zealand situation;

- to determine the effectiveness of methods to measure the incidence of television violence in New Zealand, based on the international models surveyed;

- to conduct a limited sampling exercise to determine how the incidence of violence on New Zealand television compares with other countries and with levels in New Zealand that were measured in the past;

- to determine whether the incidence of violence identified in this exercise represents a problem in the context of New Zealand society;

- to evaluate the tools for controlling the level and nature of violence on television in New Zealand - e.g. the Broadcasting Standards Authority, the Broadcasting Act 1989, codes of practice, the TVNZ Charter - by comparison with the tools available in comparable countries; and

- to publish a report incorporating recommendations to the Minister of Broadcasting.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Sector Opposes Bill: Local Government Bill Timeframe Extended

The Minister of Local Government Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga has asked the Select Committee to extend the report back date for the Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 2). More>>

ALSO:

Breed Laws Don’t Work: Vets On New National Dog Control Plan

It is pleasing therefore to see Louise Upston Associate Minister for Local Government calling for a comprehensive solution... However, relying on breed specific laws to manage dog aggression will not work. More>>

ALSO:

Not Waiting On Select Committee: Green Party Releases Medically-Assisted Dying Policy

“Adults with a terminal illness should have the right to choose a medically assisted death,” Green Party health spokesperson Kevin Hague said. “The Green Party does not support extending assisted dying to people who aren't terminally ill because we can’t be confident that this won't further marginalise the lives of people with disabilities." More>>

ALSO:

General Election Review: Changes To Electoral Act Introduced

More effective systems in polling places and earlier counting of advanced votes are on their way through proposed changes to our electoral laws, Justice Minister Amy Adams says. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Our Posturing At The UN

In New York, Key basically took an old May 2 Washington Post article written by Barack Obama, recycled it back to the Americans, and still scored headlines here at home… We’ve had a double serving of this kind of comfort food. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty Settlements: Bills Delayed As NZ First Pulls Support

Ngāruahine, Te Atiawa and Taranaki are reeling today as they learnt that the third and final readings of each Iwi’s Historical Treaty Settlement Bills scheduled for this Friday, have been put in jeopardy by the actions of NZ First. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Damage De-Regulation Is Doing To Fisheries And Education, Plus Kate Tempest

Our faith in the benign workings of the market – and of the light-handed regulation that goes with it – has had a body count. Back in 1992, the free market friendly Health Safety and Employment Act gutted the labour inspectorate and turned forestry, mining and other workplace sites into death traps, long before the Pike River disaster. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news