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Revised guide to treaty settlements launched

Revised guide to treaty settlements launched

Treaty Negotiations Minister Margaret Wilson launched the revised guide to the Treaty of Waitangi claims settlement process, “Healing the Past, Building a Future”, at Parliament today.

“The guide was first published in 1999 and this 2002 edition reflects both the policy development and the experience of iwi who have gone through the negotiations process over the past three years,” she said. “It also incorporates the government’s principles for the resolution of historical claims which I released in July 2000.”

Margaret Wilson said the guide is designed as an easy to read package for claimants and their advisers at all stages of the Treaty Settlement process, whether they are being heard by the Waitangi Tribunal, organising their mandate or engaging in negotiations.

“It will also be a useful reference tool for community groups, local government, educators and government departments. It is important everyone working within it understands the settlement process. There are currently about 10 government departments and agencies involved in the historical Treaty settlement process.”

Margaret Wilson said the guide could also play a part in educating the wider public about the significance of the Treaty of Waitangi for New Zealand, both in terms of the past and for the future.

“It gives an overview of the historical background to grievances and settlement, and explains how settlement policy has developed. We cannot settle the country’s historical injustices without the support and understanding of New Zealanders.”

The Office of Treaty Settlements website has also been updated and provides information on what settlements involve, the negotiations process, the latest updates on settlement progress, and land and property information, Margaret Wilson said.

Copies of Healing the Past, Building a Future” are available free of charge from the Office of Treaty Settlements website, www.ots.govt.nz or by contacting the Office on (04) 494 9800, email: reception.ots@justice.govt.nz


Healing the Past, Building a Future ; Ka Tika Ä Muri, Ka Tika Ä Mua

Questions and Answers

Q. What is Healing the Past, Building a Future?

A. Healing the Past, Building a Future is a guide to historical Treaty of Waitangi claims and negotiations with the Crown. It explains the foundation of the relationship between the Crown and Mäori and outlines the practicalities of the settlement process. It also sets out an overview of the historical background to Treaty grievances and settlements, and explains how settlement policy has developed.

Q. Why release a guide?

A. The guide provides concise, clear and comprehensive information for claimants and Mäori groups who may be interested in the process throughout the country. All aspects of the negotiation and settlement process are contained in one easy to read package. It is also a source of information for Treaty sector agencies and the public. The first edition released in 1999 was widely read, not only by claimants and their advisers, but by all of those with an interest in the resolution of historical Treaty claims.

Q. How is this edition different from the Healing the Past, Building a Future released in 1999?

A. This new edition has built on the experiences of both the Crown and Mäori claimants during the past three years of the settlement process. Changes have been made to reflect the development of Crown policy and practice since 1999, and the Treaty of Waitangi principles released by the Minister in July 2000.

Q. Who is the book aimed at?

A. The book is designed for claimants and their advisers at all stages of the Treaty settlement process, whether they are being heard by the Tribunal, organising their mandate or engaging in negotiations. The Office of Treaty Settlements also hopes that the book will be widely read by others with an interest in Treaty of Waitangi claims. It will be of particular use to community groups, local government, educators and government departments.
Q. What specific information can be found in the book?

A. There are four sections in the 2002 edition: the Settlement Framework; the Negotiation Process; Settlement Redress; and Supporting Information. These sections explain the historical background to the settlement process, the development of policy, the stages of negotiation, and the types of redress available. Explanations of each stage, or milestone, in the settlement process will be helpful to claimant communities and interested parties. These include the ‘Deed of Mandate’, the ‘Agreement in Principle’ and the ‘Deed of Settlement’.

What is on the Office of Treaty Settlements website?

The Office of Treaty Settlements website contains information on what settlements usually involve, the negotiation process, the latest updates on settlement progress, and land and property information. Q What other publications are available from the Office of Treaty Settlements?

A. Other publications that complement ‘Healing the Past, Building a Future’, are Protection of Mäori Assets in Surplus Crown-Owned land- Information for Crown agencies, and Protection of Mäori Assets in Surplus Crown-Owned land- Information for applicants. Both of these are available from the Office of Treaty Settlements, see contact details below.

How can I get a copy and what does it cost ?

A. Copies of the book are available free of charge from the Office of Treaty Settlements website, www.ots.govt.nz, or by contacting the Office (04) 494 9800, email reception.ots@justice.govt.nz.


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