Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


KiwiSaver Questions and Answers

KiwiSaver Questions and Answers
28 February 2006

1. What is KiwiSaver?
KiwiSaver was announced in Budget 2005 as part of a package of government initiatives designed to increase the level of savings by New Zealand households and support New Zealanders in retirement. Other initiatives include:

Introduction of the State Sector Retirement Savings Scheme, a voluntary savings scheme aimed specifically at state sector employees;
Establishing the New Zealand Superannuation (NZS) Fund, aimed at pre-funding the future cost to the government of NZS.
KiwiSaver’s purpose is to encourage a long-term savings habit and asset accumulation to improve financial wellbeing, particularly for retirement.

KiwiSaver also offers a first home deposit subsidy of $1000 per year of membership in the scheme, up to a maximum of $5000 for five years, to eligible KiwiSaver members after three years of saving.

2. How does KiwiSaver work?
KiwiSaver focuses on encouraging saving through the workplace. Saving through the workplace allows for deductions at source and provides a way to reach a broad section of the population.

Under the proposal:

All New Zealand residents below the age of eligibility for New Zealand Superannuation will be able to opt in to KiwiSaver;
Contributions will be at 4 per cent or 8 per cent of gross salary or wages before tax and will be “locked in” except for certain circumstances (such as serious financial hardship, or permanent emigration);
After a minimum of three years in the scheme, first home buyers will be able to make a one-time withdrawal to assist with the purchase of a first home;
Self employed, people under 18, current employees and beneficiaries may join but need to make payments directly to Inland Revenue or providers;
The government will make a kick start contribution of $1,000 per person (to be locked in until the recipient reaches the age of eligibility for NZS or for five years of membership, whichever is the later) and provide a contribution towards members’ fees.
The government wants to ensure that a broad group of New Zealanders can save through KiwiSaver for their retirement.

The following table shows the options for different groups to join KiwiSaver:

  How can they join KiwiSaver? How do they choose a scheme? At what rate can they contribute?
Employees (aged between 18-65) starting a new job after KiwiSaver is implemented They will be automatically enrolled, with the right to opt out They can choose their own scheme by notifying a scheme provider directly

Their employer may choose a preferred scheme, if no choice is made by the employee

Inland Revenue will allocate a default scheme if no choice is made

4% (default) or 8%
Any employees (aged between 18-65) They can choose to join by:
  • Giving his/her employer the relevant tax code declaration; or
  • Contracting directly with a scheme provider or Inland Revenue Inland Revenue will allocate a default scheme if no choice is made
Inland Revenue will allocate a default scheme if no choice is made

Their employer may choose a preferred scheme, if no choice is made by the employee

They can choose their own scheme by notifying a scheme provider directly

4% (default) or 8%
Individuals (aged between 18-65) who are not employees They can choose to join by contracting directly with a scheme provider or Inland Revenue Choose their own scheme by contracting directly with the scheme provider A rate agreed with the scheme provider
Individuals under 18 years of age (including employees and non-employees) They can choose to join by contracting directly with a scheme provider or Inland Revenue Choose their own scheme by contracting directly with the scheme provider If an employee: 4% or 8%

If not an employee: a rate agreed with the scheme provider

3. How will the 4 per cent and 8 per cent rate be calculated and what sort of amounts does it represent?
The 4 or 8 per cent will be based on an employee's gross salary or wages before tax. This includes salary or wages and other employment-related taxable allowances such as sums receivable by way of bonus, commission, extra salary, gratuity, overtime or other remuneration of any kind.


Annual gross salary/wages before tax 4% weekly contribution 8% weekly contribution
$10,000 $8 $15
$30,000 $23 $46
$50,000 $38 $77
$80,000 $62 $123
$100,000 $77 $154

4. Is participation in KiwiSaver compulsory?
All New Zealand residents below the age of eligibility for New Zealand Superannuation will be able to join KiwiSaver but participation will not be compulsory because it may not suit everyone including:

Those who would be better off repaying debt;
Those who may not wish to save or are saving for something else;
Those on low incomes and for whom New Zealand Superannuation may provide an adequate income in retirement.
It is recognised that each individual’s circumstances will be different. KiwiSaver is another option for New Zealanders to increase their own well being and financial independence, particularly in retirement.

5. What happens if an employee changes jobs or is just starting in the workforce?
Employees starting a new job on or after the implementation date will be automatically enrolled in KiwiSaver, with the ability to opt out.

International research suggests that automatic enrolment leads to higher participation in retirement savings schemes, as it helps overcome inertia, which prevents some people saving.

Automatic enrolment will apply to all new employees aged between 18 and 65 (age of eligibility for New Zealand Superannuation) who begin a job with a separate payroll (it will not apply to an employee who gets a promotion with their current employer).

An employee will be able to opt-out by notifying Inland Revenue in weeks 2-6 after starting employment. This period gives employees time to consider the decision of whether or not to join KiwiSaver, and to seek financial advice if desired. If an employee opts out, Inland Revenue will notify their employer.

6. How do savers choose which KiwiSaver scheme to join?
In making financial decisions, many people find too much choice overwhelming. At the same time, individual choice is important in encouraging individuals to take an active interest in their financial decisions.

All KiwiSaver members will be able to:

Choose their own KiwiSaver scheme and investment risk profile, such as conservative, balanced, growth;
Choose a contribution rate of either 4 per cent (default rate if no choice is made) or 8 per cent of the gross salary or wages before tax paid by the employer (an employee will be taxed on these contributions as with other income);
Transfer between KiwiSaver schemes at any time;
Cease contributions by applying to Inland Revenue for a contributions holiday after a minimum contribution period of 12 months. The contribution holiday will be for a period of up to 5 years (minimum three months) and can be renewed at the end of the period.
Individuals will be given information to help them make decisions about KiwiSaver. Members will be able to select their own investment product and can change scheme providers, but can only have one KiwiSaver scheme provider at any time.

Employees will be randomly allocated by Inland Revenue to a provider of a default scheme with a conservative investment profile unless they make an active choice to become a member of a scheme or their employer has nominated a preferred scheme to which their employees will become members.

7. What is the role of employers in KiwiSaver?
Employers will have responsibility for:

Distributing an information pack about KiwiSaver, provided by Inland Revenue, to new employees and employees that opt in outlining how the scheme works;
Automatically enrolling new employees that do not opt out;
Deducting employees' contributions and forwarding them to Inland Revenue along with PAYE;
Providing Inland Revenue with the name, IRD number and address of new employees and employees that opt in via the employer.
8. When will KiwiSaver start?
KiwiSaver is anticipated to start on 1 April 2007.

9. Will KiwiSavers’ money be protected?
KiwiSaver schemes will be governed by trust deeds and regulated similarly to registered superannuation schemes. All KiwiSaver schemes will need to be registered by the Government Actuary.

KiwiSaver investment products will be regulated consistently with other superannuation products. Only registered providers will be able to offer KiwiSaver schemes.

These providers will need to be registered, meet certain minimum ongoing requirements and disclose information to help people make a choice. The government does not guarantee any individual scheme.

10. How does a contributions holiday work?
After 12 months in the scheme, KiwiSaver members will be free to stop and start contributing as they wish by applying for a contributions holiday for up to five years at a time. At the end of the five years, contributions will resume unless a further option to cease them is exercised. Inland Revenue will oversee this process. The minimum period for a contributions holiday will be three months unless the employee’s employer agrees to a shorter period. This minimum period is to reduce compliance costs for employers in having to stop and start contribution deductions frequently.

11. Why can’t members take a contributions holiday in the first 12 months of joining?
A member will not be able to take a contributions holiday during the first 12 month period. This is to promote long-terms savings without deterring participation or penalising people for an unexpected change in their circumstances. During these 12 months, these employees may be able to access their funds in the event of serious financial hardship, excluding the $1000 government contribution.

12. What is the government’s role in Kiwi Saver?
The government will make a kick start contribution of $1000 to individuals’ KiwiSaver member accounts when contributions are first paid by Inland Revenue to the scheme provider. This up-front contribution will not be able to be withdrawn to purchase a first home or for financial hardship.

The government will also appoint the providers of the KiwiSaver default schemes, negotiate fees down with providers of default schemes, and pay a contribution towards fees paid by the member.

The government will provide additional targeted assistance to individuals purchasing a first home. Individuals who have saved for at least three years, and meet the eligibility criteria, will be entitled to a home ownership deposit subsidy of $1000 per year of savings, up to a maximum of $5000 per person.

13. How will KiwiSaver help first home buyers?
KiwiSaver will provide:

An ability for KiwiSaver participants to make a one-off withdrawal of their own savings to use for the purchase of a first home (excluding the initial government contribution), following a minimum of three years participation;
A deposit subsidy to people who have contributed to KiwiSaver for at least three years to assist with the purchase of their first home. This will be $1000 for each year of contribution, up to a maximum of five years. Regional house price caps and household income caps will be used to target this assistance.
14. How will KiwiSaver affect employers?
KiwiSaver has been designed to minimise compliance costs for employers where possible, by building off existing processes.

Employers will be required to:

Provide all new employees and those who opt-in via a tax code declaration with a KiwiSaver information pack, supplied by Inland Revenue. This pack will include general information about the KiwSaver scheme, where to obtain more information and an opt-out form;
Notify Inland Revenue that a new employee has started and pass on the new employee’s name, IRD number and address. This requirement will apply also to employees who have opted in via a tax code declaration;
Automatically enrol new employees by ensuring contributions commence from week 11 for all new employees if no advice is received from Inland Revenue that the employee has opted out;
Make deductions of KiwiSaver contributions from the gross salary or wages before tax paid to employee members.
Employers will be able to choose whether or not to:

Elect an initial provider for their employees who do not select their own KiwiSaver scheme provider. If an employer has elected a preferred KiwiSaver scheme for their employees, the employer will be required to provide an investment statement for that scheme to all new employees and those that opt-in via a tax code declaration;
Make voluntary employer contributions to KiwiSaver. Generally, an employer will be able to determine their own rules and conditions around such contributions;
Apply to the Government Actuary for an exemption from the automatic enrolment requirements if they have a registered superannuation scheme that meets certain criteria. This aims to ensure that KiwiSaver does not encourage good employer schemes to wind up. Employees who join such schemes will be eligible to apply for the home ownership deposit subsidy, subject to meeting eligibility criteria, but will not be eligible for any other government contribution, i.e. $1000 kick start or fee contribution.
In addition, an employers’ current superannuation scheme may choose to convert to a KiwiSaver scheme under their existing trust deed.

15. Do all employers have to offer KiwiSaver in their workplace?
Yes. All employees should have the opportunity of joining KiwiSaver.

16. What if an employer already has an alternative registered superannuation scheme?
An employer with an existing registered superannuation scheme will be able to apply to be exempt from the automatic enrolment requirements if that scheme meets the following criteria:

Open to all new permanent (including part-time) employees;
Portable (members can transfer balances to other schemes when they leave their employer);
The minimum employee contribution combined with the maximum employer contribution is at least 4 per cent of gross salary; and
Employer contributions vest in the employee within 5 years of the employee becoming a member of the scheme.
Employees whose employer is exempt from the automatic enrolment provisions will still be able to join KiwiSaver (by opting-in).

In addition, an existing employer scheme has the option of converting into a KiwiSaver scheme under their existing trust deed.

If an employer is merely acting as a conduit or passing on information about KiwiSaver to its employees, or selecting a preferred KiwSaver scheme for its employees, the employer will not be liable as an investment adviser or promoter under the investment advisers and securities legislation.

17. Can KiwiSaver members borrow against their savings?
No. Scheme assets will not be able to be used as security for borrowing.

18. Do employers have to give financial advice?
No. Employers will be provided with KiwiSaver information packs to give their employees that outlines how the scheme works, and provides details of how employees can receive further advice, including financial advice.

If an employer is merely acting as a conduit or passing on information about KiwiSaver to their employees, or selecting a preferred KiwiSaver scheme for its employees, the employer will not be liable as an investment adviser or promoter under the investment advisers and securities legislation.

19. How will the default KiwiSaver scheme providers be selected?
An open competitive tender process will be run to select a limited number of default KiwiSaver scheme providers. The tender process is expected to commence in mid-March 2006.

20. Upon reaching the age of entitlement for New Zealand Superannuation, will people be able to get their savings out in a lump sum or will it be paid out in an annuity?
Upon reaching the age of eligibility for New Zealand Superannuation all members will have the option of withdrawing the funds as a lump sum (although providers may choose to also offer other options, such as an annuity).

21. Will Inland Revenue pay interest on contributions held by it before those contributions are transferred to the KiwiSaver scheme provider?
Yes. Inland Revenue will pay interest on contributions held. The rate of interest will be the Commissioner’s paying rate set for the use of money interest rules.

This rate is set at the 90-day bill rate less 100 basis points.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Also, Loan Interest: Productivity Commission On Tertiary Education

Key recommendations include better quality control; making it easier for students to transfer between courses; abolishing University Entrance; enabling tertiary institutions to own and control their assets; making it easier for new providers to enter the system; and facilitating more and faster innovation by tertiary education providers... More>>

ALSO:

Higher Payments: Wellington Regional Council Becomes A Living Wage Employer

Councillor Sue Kedgley said she was delighted that the Wellington Regional Council unanimously adopted her motion to become a Living Wage employer, making it the first regional council in New Zealand to do so. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Images:
Dame Patsy Reddy Sworn In As Governor-General

This morning Dame Patsy Reddy was sworn in as the New Zealand Realm’s 21st Governor-General. The ceremony began with a pōwhiri to welcome Dame Patsy and her husband Sir David Gascoigne to Parliament. More>>

ALSO:

Ruataniwha: DOC, Hawke's Bay Council Developer Take Supreme Court Appeal

The Department of Conservation and Hawke's Bay Regional Investment Company (HBRIC) are appealing to the Supreme Court over a conservation land swap which the Court of Appeal halted. More>>

ALSO:

With NZ's Marama Davidson: Women’s Flotilla Leaves Sicily – Heading For Gaza

Women representing 13 countries spanning five continents began their journey yesterday on Zaytouna-Oliva to the shores of Gaza, which has been under blockade since 2007. On board are a Nobel Peace Laureate, three parliamentarians, a decorated US diplomat, journalists, an Olympic athlete, and a physician. A list of the women with their background can be found here. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Key Style Of Crisis Management

At Monday’s post Cabinet press conference Key was in his finest wide- eyed “Problem? What problem?” mode. No, there wasn’t really a problem that top MPI officials had been at odds with each other over the meaning of the fisheries policy and how that policy should be pursued... More>>

ALSO:

Mt Roskill: Greens Will Not Stand In Likely Post-Goff By-Election

“The Green Party’s priority is changing the Government in 2017, and as part of that we’ve decided that we won’t stand a candidate in the probable Mt Roskill by-election... This decision shows the Memorandum of Understanding between Labour and the Green Party is working." More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news