Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


The state of our nation 1999-2007 – some facts

Hon Steve Maharey
Minister of Education

30 January 2007

The state of our nation 1999-2007 – some facts and examples

Living standards

* 61,000 children have been lifted out of poverty under Labour
* Child poverty rates fell from 27 to 21 per cent in the 3 years to 2004
* Working for Families is predicted to reduce child poverty by up to 70 percent
* Incomes for the poorest households have increased in real terms since 1999
* The cost of housing for people on low incomes has fallen dramatically - households spending more than a third of their income on housing fell from 42 percent in 2001 to 35 percent in 2004
* Working for Families means families earning less than $35,000 will effectively pay no tax by 2008

Unemployment
* New Zealand has achieved the lowest recorded unemployment since 1982 and the second lowest in the OECD
* We have the highest number of Kiwis ever in work at 2.1 million
* Long-term unemployment fell by 70 percent since 1999

Outcomes for Maori
* Median incomes for Maori increased by 24 percent in real terms between 2001 and 2006 – faster than for the population as a whole
* The number of Maori receiving the unemployment benefit dropped from 41,000 in 1999 to 15,000 in 2006 - a reduction of 64%.
* There has been a huge leap in the number of Maori earning more than $50,000 (from 14,850 in 2001 to 33,070 in 2006). The number of Maori earning less than $20,000 dropped by over 11% between 2001 and 2006.

Justice
* NZ has the lowest recorded crime rate in a generation
* Recorded crime has continued to decline from the early 1990s, from a peak of 1322 crimes per 10,000 population in 1992 to 994 in 2005.
* The number of murders has stayed roughly constant the past 10 years. The highest recorded number was in 1996.
* 1000 extra frontline police staff will be in place over the next three years.
* Emergency 111 targets are being met consistently.

Education
* The proportion of students going directly from school to tertiary education has increased from 45 per cent in 1998 to 57 per cent in 2004
* 57 percent of students achieved level 2 NCEA or better last year – up from an equivalent 37 percent in the mid 1990s under school certificate
* The number of students leaving with little or no formal attainment (13 or less credits) has fallen from 18.2% in 2002 to around 13% in 2005.
* Maori participation in tertiary education has increased at a faster rate than for the population as a whole
* 57,000 young kiwis are benefiting from the Fruit in Schools programme, offering access to fruit and teaching them and their families about nutrition
* Programmes are lifting literacy and numeracy standards in thousands of schools, for example, the Otara writing cluster which lifted writing levels in every participating school - year 4 to 8 students have gained nearly a year in addition to normal progress in reading comprehension
* Kiwi students at both primary and secondary level, continue to be among the best in the OECD in reading, mathematics and science.

Sport and communities
* Sport and recreation services received $58 million in 2006 compared to $2.5 million in 1999.
* Examples are "Sportfit", a programme that provides sport opportunities in secondary schools; "Active Schools" which aims to improve physical activity opportunities and experiences for primary school children; a volunteers strategy which is aimed at encouraging more volunteers in sport, and Coachcorp - a programme involving businesses.
* The competitive contracting model for NGOs has been replaced with a partnership model and funding has increased for community organisations

Health costs
* The cost of visiting a family doctor has fallen by half
* All New Zealand children now have access to free or low cost health care, extending to all NZers from 1 July

Child Youth and Family
* CYF is consistently meeting or exceeding performance targets for its most critical levels - unallocated cases have reduced from more than 3,000 in October 2004 down to 435 in October 2006.
* In the five years to 2003, 38 children under 15 years of age died as a result of maltreatment, a decline from 50 in the previous five-year period.
* Figures on child maltreatment deaths should be treated with caution because, in a small country like New Zealand, the very small numbers involved produce highly volatile rates.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Sector Opposes Bill: Local Government Bill Timeframe Extended

The Minister of Local Government Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga has asked the Select Committee to extend the report back date for the Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 2). More>>

ALSO:

Breed Laws Don’t Work: Vets On New National Dog Control Plan

It is pleasing therefore to see Louise Upston Associate Minister for Local Government calling for a comprehensive solution... However, relying on breed specific laws to manage dog aggression will not work. More>>

ALSO:

Not Waiting On Select Committee: Green Party Releases Medically-Assisted Dying Policy

“Adults with a terminal illness should have the right to choose a medically assisted death,” Green Party health spokesperson Kevin Hague said. “The Green Party does not support extending assisted dying to people who aren't terminally ill because we can’t be confident that this won't further marginalise the lives of people with disabilities." More>>

ALSO:

General Election Review: Changes To Electoral Act Introduced

More effective systems in polling places and earlier counting of advanced votes are on their way through proposed changes to our electoral laws, Justice Minister Amy Adams says. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Our Posturing At The UN

In New York, Key basically took an old May 2 Washington Post article written by Barack Obama, recycled it back to the Americans, and still scored headlines here at home… We’ve had a double serving of this kind of comfort food. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty Settlements: Bills Delayed As NZ First Pulls Support

Ngāruahine, Te Atiawa and Taranaki are reeling today as they learnt that the third and final readings of each Iwi’s Historical Treaty Settlement Bills scheduled for this Friday, have been put in jeopardy by the actions of NZ First. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Damage De-Regulation Is Doing To Fisheries And Education, Plus Kate Tempest

Our faith in the benign workings of the market – and of the light-handed regulation that goes with it – has had a body count. Back in 1992, the free market friendly Health Safety and Employment Act gutted the labour inspectorate and turned forestry, mining and other workplace sites into death traps, long before the Pike River disaster. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news