Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Government announces emissions trading scheme

20 September 2007 Media Statement

Government announces emissions trading scheme

An emissions trading scheme will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, promote environmentally friendly behaviour and create business opportunities for New Zealanders, according to Finance Minister Michael Cullen and Climate Change Minister David Parker.

The scheme, announced by the Labour-led government today, will be phased in from next year, beginning with the forestry industry, and including all sectors and gases over time.

“Climate change is a real threat from which New Zealand is not immune. We must do our bit to help the world deal with it. As part of our response to climate change, Cabinet has agreed to the key design features for a New Zealand emissions trading scheme,” said Dr Cullen.

“An emissions trading scheme will create an incentive for businesses and households to make decisions that are good for the environment, and will discourage actions that cause greenhouse gas emissions.”

New Zealand’s forestry industry will receive incentives to plant trees equivalent to hundreds of millions of dollars under the scheme.

“Forestry is critical to New Zealand’s response to climate change. We want to see more forests planted, and we want to see harvested forests replaced. The government, therefore, has agreed with the forestry sector that they should receive a free allocation of carbon credits,” Dr Cullen said.

“Consistent with the commitments we have made to farmers, the government is proposing that agriculture will not join the scheme until 2013, and the sector will also receive generous free allocation equivalent to 90 percent of their 2005 emissions.

“We have designed the scheme to assist business as much as possible without defeating the purpose of the scheme, and other industries will also receive transitional assistance.”

New Zealand is one of a number of countries, such as the UK, Australia, the EU and parts of the US, which have or are developing such schemes.

“This is the way the world is heading,” David Parker said. “For those at the forefront of carbon-friendly services and technologies there are considerable opportunities emerging from such an economic transformation. Sectors such as tourism and viticulture have already identified this and are planning and investing based on sustainability. Energy efficiency in businesses will also improve their competitiveness.

“There will be increased costs in, for example, petrol and energy. The government will look at what assistance households need to adjust to these increases. There will also be increased efforts to make all households more energy efficient – through insulation, solar panels, and other measures.

“The development of an emissions trading scheme demonstrates the government listened during consultation on policy options earlier this year,” said Mr Parker.

“Submissions received during this consultation on the five climate change and energy discussion documents made it clear that there is a high level of support for emissions trading.

“The government is now committed to providing opportunities for detailed engagement with interested parties, such as industry, consumer groups, NGOs and Maori, to ensure the final design of the scheme is fair and can be implemented effectively,” said David Parker.

The engagement, which is happening from now until November this year, will focus on the core design elements and will include a series of hui to address priority issues for Maori.

Once emissions trading scheme legislation has been introduced, the public will be able to provide further input as part of the select committee process.

“The government looks forward to working collaboratively with all those involved, as it develops a scheme that will work for New Zealanders in the long term,” said Mr Parker.

For more information see: www.climatechange.govt.nz

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gaza.Scoop: Another Israeli Attack On A Hospital

Israeli tanks attacked Al Aqsa hospital in Deir Al Balah, killing five patients and doctors, and injuring more than 70.

The third and fourth floors, housing the emergency department, orthopaedic department, surgical department, and the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) were destroyed. Operating theatres had to cease work because of the lack of oxygen.

Patients are being evacuated to Shifa Hospital in Gaza City, and the European Gaza Hospital between Rafah and Khan Younes. More>>

 

Parliament Today:

Red Tape: Local Regulations Go Under Microscope

The Government says it is accepting nearly all of the recommendations the Productivity Commission has made on ways to improve local regulations. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Non-Apology To Tania Billingsley

The refusal by Prime Minister John Key to issue a personal apology to Tania Billingsley has been accompanied by an array of excuses... Yesterday though, Key’s choice of words indicated that an apology was the last thing on his mind. More>>

ALSO:

Conventions: Winston Peters On The Nation

Winston Peters opens door to standing in East Coast Bays electorate, says it's an "exciting point" and he's thinking about it. "I’ve had a whole lot of people writing to me and calling up and saying ‘why don’t you have a go in East Coast Bays’." More>>

ALSO:

Waitangi Tribunal: Report On The MV Rena

In its interim report, the Waitangi Tribunal has found that the Crown’s conduct in response to the grounding of the MV Rena on Otaiti (Astrolabe) reef breached the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. More>>

ALSO:

Gaza: Wellington Protest For Palestine Calls For End To Bombing

Around 300 people gathered outside the Israeli Embassy in Wellington on Friday to protest Israel’s occupation of Palestine. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Failure To Prosecute The GCSB

So one hand of the state – the Independent Police Conduct Authority – has now washed the hands of its brother agencies, and declared that all hands are clean. Case closed. More>>

ALSO:

Illegal Search: Police Behaviour 'Reminiscent Of Tūhoe Raids'

"Māori will lose further trust and confidence in the New Zealand Police and the Independent Police Conduct Authority (IPCA) if the recent incident in Stratford is not adequately addressed. This behaviour would not occur in Epsom or Khandallah so why should police think that such behaviour was acceptable in Stratford," says Chris McKenzie. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell:
On The Dotcom Emails

The Dotcom residency decision fails any number of sniff tests... Why, then, was it approved? Here we get into the realm of the “INZ being under political pressure” to approve Dotcom’s application. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Shonky Police Statistics, And The Israeli Air Strikes On Gaza

When people systematically alter how being statistics are recorded in order to gain personal and organisational advantage, that’s usually when the Police get called in. Yet in the case of the burglary statistics in Counties-Manakau, it was the Police doing the fudging and – at the time – it was then-Police Minister Judith Collins claiming the credit... More>>

ALSO:

'Clean Rivers': Green Party Launches Key Election Priority

The Green Party will make a series of announcements over the course of the election campaign in which it will outline the specifics of how it will clean up our rivers and protect our beaches. In the first of these announcements the party launched its plan for clean rivers. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news