Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

Govt Chooses Revenue Over Road Toll

Govt Chooses Revenue Over Road Toll

Immediate Release:


Completely lost in the recent debate around the extension of the demerit points system - announced by Transport Minister Annette King before Christmas - is the issue of speed cameras, ACT New Zealand Deputy Leader Heather Roy said today.

"Both Transport Minister King and Transport Safety Minister Harry Duynhoven have gone to great lengths to tell the public that fines don't work, and that demerits and license suspensions are more effective," Mrs Roy said.

"Minister King announced that fines for offences, such as speeding, will be cut - claiming that many young drivers were accumulating large fines, which they could not pay, and fines did not deter them from driving recklessly.

"Why, then, are speed cameras still operating - usually carefully hidden around corners, behind land masses and in shrubbery? The answer is that they are - and always have been - a means of revenue gathering.

"What most people forget is the graduated way in which speed cameras were introduced. First, they had to be easily visible - at Black Spots only; and there had to be signs warning that they were operating in the area. Now, however, they operate with impunity everywhere and, all too often, are cleverly concealed - but not in accident areas. Speed cameras do not attract demerit points - just fines that the Government tell us don't work. This is merely revenue gathering.

"While increasing demerit points and decreasing fines is a step in the right direction, it takes more than words to put this into action. Recidivist repeat offenders are the real issue - one the Government has a very poor record of dealing with.

"Continuing with speed cameras as the main strategy is misguided and greedy. What is needed is some honesty from the Government - which should admit that it wants the revenue in its war chest to pay for pledge cards and bribes in election year.

"If the Government were serious about reducing the road toll and improving safety on our roads it would place the emphasis on policing driving habits on known 'black spots', and follow up on the 5,843 drivers who should have had their licence suspended," Mrs Roy said.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Back Again: Government Approves TPP11 Mandate

The Government has approved a negotiating mandate for Trans-Pacific Partnership 11 (TPP11), which will ensure New Zealand businesses remain competitive in overseas markets.

Trade Minister Todd McClay says New Zealand will be pushing for the minimal number of changes possible to the original TPP agreement, something that the remaining TPP11 countries have agreed on. More>>

ALSO:

.

 
 

Gordon Campbell: On Why Labour Isn’t Responsible For Barnaby Joyce

As a desperate Turnbull government tries to treat the Barnaby Joyce affair as a Pauline Hanson fever dream – blame it on the foreigners! We’re the victims of the dastardly New Zealand Labour Party! – our own government has chosen to further that narrative, and make itself an accomplice. More>>

ALSO:

Rail: Greens Back Tauranga – Hamilton – Auckland Service

The Green Party today announced that it will trial a passenger rail service between Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga starting in 2019, when it is in government. More>>

ALSO:

Housing: Voluntary Rental Warrant Of Fitness For Wellington

Wellington City Council is partnering with the University of Otago, Wellington, to launch a voluntary Rental Warrant of Fitness for minimum housing standards in Wellington, Mayor Justin Lester has announced. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty: Agreement In Principle Signed With Moriori

“The Crown acknowledges Moriori was left virtually landless from 1870, hindering its cultural, social and economic development. The Crown also acknowledges its contribution to the myths that the people of Moriori were racially inferior and became extinct." More>>

ALSO:

Susan Devoy: Call For Inquiry Into State Abuse Reaches UN

Race Relations Commissioner Dame Susan Devoy is in Geneva and has asked a United Nations committee to urge the New Zealand government to initiate an inquiry into the physical and sexual abuse of children and disabled people held in state institutions. More>>

ALSO:

(Not National): Cross-Party Agreement On Pike River Re-Entry

The commitment was signed this afternoon by the leaders of Labour, United Future, The Maori Party, and the Green Party and, together with the earlier commitment by New Zealand First, means that there is now a Parliamentary majority behind the families’ fight for truth and justice. More>>

ALSO:

Earlier:

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election