Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

The Mapp Report - A One Frigate Navy

A One Frigate Navy

Over the last few months I have been told by many people that one of the two frigates, Te Kaha, had effectively been placed in reserve, useful for only short patrols in the Hauraki Gulf.

Recent Parliamentary questions seem to show there is some truth in this. As a rule, our frigates spend 150 to 160 days per year at sea. This usually involves an extensive international operation into the North Pacific or the Gulf. In fact, Te Mana is about to be deployed to the Gulf as part of multilateral operations against terrorism.

Tied up at the wharf
However, over the last 18 months the Defence Force has been operating Te Kaha on a minimal basis. In 2007 it spent 79 days at sea; not even one day in four. This year it is expected to spend 97 days at sea. Its readiness is now 24 hours to sail, instead of the usual 12 hours. Many of the allocated crew are apparently undertaking shore courses. Several exercises this year have already been ‘affected’, that is largely not undertaken. What this adds up to is a one frigate Navy, with one in reserve.

Capability reduction
This reduction in capability further highlights the personnel problems in the Defence Force. The Army can no longer deploy a Battalion overseas on operations; the Navy has become a ‘one frigate Navy, with one in reserve’.

The defence doctrine of the government is based on ‘depth not breadth’. It has not been achieved. In fact the opposite is occurring; the Defence Force is losing depth. The Labour government has failed to achieve its goal.

People are the challenge
Building up personnel numbers is the most critical challenge facing the Defence Force This will be at the core of National’s Defence White Paper.

ROAD WOES CONTINUE

Many of us have endured the seemingly endless rebuild of Esmonde Road. The improvements to the corner of Lake and Esmonde Roads have taken many months and they are still not complete.

The City Council’s Project Engineer has told me that this project, which cost $1.8 million, will be completed at the end of Anzac Weekend, that is three weeks from now. The delays in completing this project, and the failure to keep residents and motorists informed of progress or lack of it, as well as the nightmare traffic conditions, have really taxed the patience of motorists and residents.

Napier Street to Hauraki Corner
The Council says that completion of Phase 2 of this project (rebuilding Lake Road from Napier Street corner to Hauraki Corner) won’t start until October 2009, so we are in for a rough ride over the next 18 months. The total cost of this phase is budgeted for $12.8 million. This figure includes $700,000 for the cycleway extensions, and $500,000 for the traffic management of local area side roads.

Two year project!
The Council still has to purchase the properties, so this could clearly delay the project further. The Council says the whole project will not be complete until December 2010, so the actual road works will take over a year.

The Council and Transit need a better plan. The Esmonde Road contract took long enough. Surely lessons have been learned which would enable this project to be done faster? Many people have commented to me that the Esmonde Motorway Interchange seemed to be done much more effectively than the Esmonde-Lake Road intersection. North Shore residents are looking for better performance in these contracts. 4 April 2008


EVENTS

PUBLIC MEETING – HEALTH CRISIS

Monday 21 April
7.30pm – 10.00pm

Guest Speaker – Hon Tony Ryall (National’s Health Spokesman)

North Harbour Netball Centre, Northcote Road

Call 486 0005 for more information.


SUPERBLUES LUNCH

Monday 5 May
12.30pm – 2.00pm

Guest Speaker – Dr Jackie Blue (National’s Women’s Affairs Spokeswoman)

Taitamariki Guide Hall, Auburn Street, Takapuna

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The Life And Times Of Peter Dunne

In the end, Mr Pragmatic calmly read the signs of impending defeat and went out on his own terms. You could use any number of clichés to describe Peter Dunne’s exit from Parliament.

The unkind might talk of sinking ships, others could be more reminded of a loaded revolver left on the desk by his Cabinet colleagues as they closed the door behind them, now that the polls in Ohariu had confirmed he was no longer of much use to National. More>>

 

Gordon Campbell: On Labour’s Campaign Launch

One of the key motifs of Ardern’s speech was her repeated use of the phrase – “Now, what?” Cleverly, that looks like being Labour’s response to National’s ‘steady as it goes’ warning against not putting the economic ‘gains’ at risk. More>>

ALSO:

Lyndon Hood: Social Welfare, Explained

Speaking as someone who has seen better times and nowadays mostly operates by being really annoying and humiliating to deal with, I have some fellow feeling with the current system, so I’ll take this chance to set a few things straight.. More>>

ALSO:

Deregistered: Independent Board Decision On Family First

The Board considers that Family First has a purpose to promote its own particular views about marriage and the traditional family that cannot be determined to be for the public benefit in a way previously accepted as charitable... More>>

ALSO:

Transport Policies: Nats' New $10.5bn Roads Of National Significance

National is committing to the next generation of Roads of National Significance, National Party Transport Spokesperson Simon Bridges says. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Why Labour Isn’t Responsible For Barnaby Joyce

As a desperate Turnbull government tries to treat the Barnaby Joyce affair as a Pauline Hanson fever dream – blame it on the foreigners! We’re the victims of the dastardly New Zealand Labour Party! – our own government has chosen to further that narrative, and make itself an accomplice. More>>

ALSO:

Rail: Greens Back Tauranga – Hamilton – Auckland Service

The Green Party today announced that it will trial a passenger rail service between Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga starting in 2019, when it is in government. More>>

ALSO:

Housing: Voluntary Rental Warrant Of Fitness For Wellington

Wellington City Council is partnering with the University of Otago, Wellington, to launch a voluntary Rental Warrant of Fitness for minimum housing standards in Wellington, Mayor Justin Lester has announced. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election