Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Clark donkey deep in smear campaign

Gerry Brownlee MP
National Party Shadow Leader of the House

30 October 2008

Clark donkey deep in smear campaign

National Party Shadow Leader of the House Gerry Brownlee says it defies belief that Labour's self-appointed chief strategist, Helen Clark, did not know what Mike Williams was up to in Australia.

"Mike Williams is the president of the party. He vanished in the middle of an election campaign and Helen Clark wants us to believe she didn't know why. That is simply not credible.

"Of course Helen Clark knew what her friend and long-time president was up to. This is the man she shares texts with several times a day. This is desperate stuff."

Mr Brownlee says Helen Clark should come clean about her involvement in the organised smear and answer questions about the resources devoted to the dirt campaign on John Key.

"Did the research unit go? Who paid? How is the Standard website involved?"

Mr Brownlee says the smear was an obvious attempt to deflect attention away from Helen Clark's problems with her stood-down Minister, Winston Peters.

"The Peters problem didn't happen 20 years ago, it happened in February this year.

"Helen Clark should release the Foreign Affairs note or memo which proves her claim that she intervened in Winston Peters' attempts to appoint Owen Glenn as honorary consul.

"If Helen Clark did intervene in the way she claims, Foreign Affairs will have some record of that.

"She should also say why she didn't reveal this intervention until the damning trail of official emails was produced this week. This was obviously a material part of the story and she kept it to herself.

"This is just more proof that when Mr Peters held up his 'NO' sign Helen Clark knew the answer was really yes."

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Election Day: Make Sure You're A Part Of It!

Saturday 20 September, is election day, and New Zealanders’ last chance to have a say on who leads the country for the next three years.

“The people and parties we elect tomorrow will be making the decisions that affect us, our families and our communities,” says Robert Peden, Chief Electoral Officer. “It doesn’t get much more important than that, and we need all New Zealanders to use their voice and vote.”

Voting places will be open from 9.00am until 7.00pm on election day. The busiest time at voting places is usually 9.00am - 11.00am.

“Take your EasyVote card with you when you go to vote, as it will make voting faster and easier, and vote close to home if you can. But don’t worry if you forget your card, or didn’t receive one, because as long as you are enrolled to vote, your voice will be heard,” says Mr Peden. More>>

 

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news