Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

Katene urges whanau to start planning

Rahui Katene
Maori Party MP for Te Tai Tonga (includes Christchurch)
2 March 2011

Katene urges whanau to start planning

The local Māori MP for Christchurch Rāhui Katene says her office is becoming inundated with calls from people throughout the country wanting to help the people of Otautahi.

“We’re getting calls as far as Te Rerenga Wairua, through to Taranaki, the East Coast and many other places, particularly, in the North Island,” Mrs Katene said.

“A lot of people want to hop on a plane to Christchurch with gear to shovel the liquefaction, food to give to the needy and muscle power to lift aid, but the infrastructure here simply can’t support them all.

“As a result I am encouraging our people in the North Island and out of the Canterbury district to not only keep our whānau here in their prayers or to donate to the earthquake charitable trust, but to also start emergency planning among their own whānau, marae, iwi and communities.

“It is always best for our whānau, no matter where they live, to have an emergency plan. Being as best prepared as possible is our best defence.

“I also urge our people that once they have a plan for their whānau and marae, to then contact their local council [which is responsible for civil defence at a local level] to see how they can help.

“There is a need for a strong Māori presence in Civil Defence because this is the group that has the resources, from portaloos to food, so our people need to link up directly with that.”

Mrs Katene said it was great to see most of the marae in Te Tau Ihu set up their own plans with Civil Defence either prior to or immediately after last year’s earthquake.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Max Rashbrooke: On How To Make Government
More Open

It’s true that New Zealand scores well on many international rankings of openness... Those findings are all important, and welcome. But we cannot ignore the fact that there are still serious problems.

For a start, those international surveys, while often complimentary, have also pinpointed major weaknesses: political donations are badly regulated, for instance, and appointments to government boards frequently go to those with strong political connections. More>>

 
 

Gordon Campbell: On The Fallout From The Barclay Tape

This is hardly a case of cleaning out your desk and being turfed out onto the pavement. As others have pointed out, the disgraced Clutha-Southland MP will remain on the public payroll for three months until the election, and for three months afterwards. More>>

ALSO:

Visions: National Party Conference

National Party leader Bill English today outlined his vision to take New Zealand into the 2020s and his key priorities for the next Parliamentary term – including further raising incomes and reducing taxes. More>>

ALSO:

Ombudsman: Canterbury Schools Reorganisation Mishandled

An investigation into the Canterbury schools reorganisation after the February 2011 earthquakes has found significant gaps and flaws in the Ministry’s engagement and communications with schools and communities. More>>

ALSO:

Law Commission: Contempt Report "Protects Right To Fair Trial"

The proposed Act limits what news media representatives and bloggers can report on court proceedings, but it also makes clearer than the current law where the line is between contempt and freedom of expression. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog