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Unemployment hits Maori and Pasifika hardest

Su’a William
SIO
Employment Spokesperson
MP for Mangere

8 November 2012 MEDIA STATEMENT

Unemployment hits Maori and Pasifika hardest

National’s failed attempt to create jobs is hitting Maori and Pasifika the hardest, with unemployment rates above 15 per cent, says Labour’s Employment spokesperson Su’a William Sio.

“Unemployment at an alarming 7.3 per cent is worrying enough. But the news is even worse for Maori and Pasifika.

“The unemployment rate for Pasifika people is 15.6 per cent with Māori unemployment at 15.1 per cent. The Government has failed to make any attempt to address Māori and Pasifika unemployment and is leaving them to fend for themselves.

“In today’s tough times, there is no challenge more urgent than addressing the lack of decent job opportunities and ensuring New Zealanders get the skills they need to participate more fully in the workforce.

“John Key is taking us down a path of fewer jobs, lower wages and our young people are looking for better opportunities in Australia. Since National has been in office the number of people unemployed has increased by 70,000 and is clearly the biggest example of the Government failing to do anything to create jobs.

“Labour has always been committed to ensuring that every New Zealander has the same opportunity to get ahead, and our economic policies will create these opportunities for everyone.

We are committed to working with industry and business to find new, innovative ways of creating jobs.

“The John Key Government has failed New Zealanders on his promise to create more jobs and opportunities,” said Su’a William Sio.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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