Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Ngāti Manuhiri Claims Settlement Bill: Third Reading


Hon Dr Pita Sharples

Minister of Maori Affairs

15 November 2012

SPEECH

Ngāti Manuhiri Claims Settlement Bill: Third Reading

Thursday 15 November 2012

Mr Speaker, I move that the Ngati Manuhiri Claims Settlement Bill, be now read for the third time.

From the shores of Whangaparaoa in the south, Paepae-o-Tū in the north.

From the western tides of Kōritotī, Ōtakamaitū, through the currents of Te Awa o Hōteo, flowing on to Kīkītangiao, Hauhanganui to the Pā of Te Arai o Tahuhu.

The children of Manuhiri, the people of Moekaraka Waka.

Ko Tamahunga te maunga

Ko Ngā Poito o te Kupenga o Toi te Huatahi te moana

Ko Ngāti Manuhiri te hapū

Ko Ōmaha te marae

From the house of Te Kiri to the New Zealand House of Representatives.

Nau Mai, Haere Mai.

Mr Speaker, it is in times like this when you look out from the steps of parliament and see kuia, koroua and mokopuna heading into these buildings.

When you see wheelchairs, walkers and prams being wheeled into these buildings.

When this is the sight that greets you on a grey Wellington morning?

Then Mr Speaker, you know the journey these people are on has taken generations, sacrifice and grievance to reach us today.

Their journey has seen many loved ones pass on.

Their journey has seen unimaginable, economic and social loss carved into generations of families.

Their journey has seen great courage and conviction shown by generations of families.

But by the end of this day Mr Speaker, their journey will finally see justice for the people of Ngāti Manuhiri.

Mr Speaker.

Early contact with European settlers led to epidemic disease or rewharewha, decimating the families of Ngāti Manuhiri.

Around 1840 Ngāti Manuhiri held customary, mana whenua rights over two hundred and fifty thousand acres.

Fifty years later? Ninety per cent of their lands? Gone.

Lost forever.

Today Ngāti Manuhiri land holdings total a mere thirteen hundred acres, fragmented and multiply owned.

In two thousand and twelve Ngāti Manuhiri are all but landless in their own homelands.

The Crown’s alienation of Ngāti Manuhiri lands began soon after the Treaty of Waitangi was signed.

The forced Mahurangi and Ōmaha purchase saw thousands of hectares lost. Crown policies saw those lands they were left with individualised, fragmented and uneconomic. Laws were passed that overnight turned Ngāti Manuhiri descendents into trespassers on their own whenua. Aue taukiri e -

As dawn broke on the twentieth of January eighteen ninety six, Police officers, artillerymen and government officials landed on Te Hauturu O Toi Island and forcibly evicted the rangatira and families of Ngāti Manuhiri.

The impacts arising from the Crown’s breaches of the Treaty of Waitangi have been carried over many years, by generations of Ngāti Manuhiri people.

Without the land and resources to take ownership of their own destiny, generations of Ngāti Manuhiri people’s right to determine their own economic and social wellbeing was denied.

This land loss, this landlessness, meant the right of Ngāti Manuhiri to uphold their own mana motuhake, to exercise their own rangatiratanga, was denied.

As we stand together this morning, the Crown alongside Manuhiri: we look back through time and see injustice and suffering.

All those things Ngāti Manuhiri families have lost due to the actions of the Crown can never be totally replaced.

And yet, Mr Speaker, the people of Ngāti Manuhiri are here today to settle their grievances with the Crown with mana, with honour.

The people of Ngāti Manuhiri are looking ahead towards their future and it is a bright one, Mr Speaker.

It is a future that will focus on restoring the economic, environmental, social and cultural health of ngā uri o Ngāti Manuhiri.

From this day on, Ngāti Manuhiri seek the right to take ownership of their own destiny, to determine their own economic, social and cultural wellbeing.

With the support of the Crown, Ngāti Manuhiri seeks the right to uphold their own mana motuhake, to exercise their own rangatiratanga.

To quote the Ngāti Manuhiri whakataukī that encapsulates their mana whenua, mana moana bonds to their rohe.

He whā tawhara ki uta

He kiko tāmure ki tai

From the flowering kiekie on our lands to the flesh of the snapper deep in our waters: our fortune, our future forever.

Mr Speaker, I commend this Bill to the House.

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Royals: The Prince Of Wales And Duchess Of Cornwall To Visit

Prime Minister John Key welcomes today’s announcement that the Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall will visit New Zealand in November. This will be the second joint visit for Their Royal Highnesses to New Zealand. More>>

ALSO:

Tracey Martin Replaced: Ron Mark Is New New Zealand First Deputy Leader

Clayton Mitchell was the successful candidate for the Associate Whip position. Winston Peters was re-elected as Leader by the Caucus. Ron Mark was elected as the Deputy Leader with effect from 10am, Friday, 3rd July. More>>

ALSO:

Rebuild Rebrand: "Regenerate Christchurch" To Replace CERA

The regeneration of Christchurch will be the city’s focus for the next five years as local leadership progressively takes control of the rebuild, Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee says. More>>

ALSO:

Nauru: Scholars Urge Minister To Act On Deteriorating Democracy

“Since the 2013 election in Nauru, there has been a series of disturbing developments on the islands that indicate a severe deterioration in the state of its parliamentary democracy and in the rule of law,” say the scholars. More>>

ALSO:

Foreign Affairs: NZ Begins Presidency Of UN Security Council

Prime Minister John Key has welcomed the start of New Zealand’s month-long Presidency of the United Nations Security Council in New York. More>>

ALSO:

Labour: Cash For Charter Schools, Mould For State Schools

“Recently released financial statements show the Whangarei charter school He Puna Marama received $3.9 million in government funding to the end of last year. Yet their audited accounts show they only spent $1.4 million on education, leaving almost $2.5 million over two years unaccounted for." More>>

ALSO:

Kiwirail Plans Shift From Electric: National Urged Not To Take Backwards Step

The National Government shouldn’t drag New Zealand backwards by replacing its climate friendly electric trains with carbon-polluting diesel trains, the Green Party said today. More>>

ALSO:

Capital Connection:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news