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Two Treaty bills passed



Hon Christopher Finlayson
Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations

15 November 2012 Media Statement

Two Treaty bills passed

The House today passed two bills giving effect to the historical Treaty of Waitangi settlements of Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei in the Tāmaki-Makaurau (Auckland) area, Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Minister Christopher Finlayson announced.

“These bills provide important redress and acknowledgement of the wrongs of the past for these groups,” Mr Finlayson said. “They are also a significant step towards settling the complex historical claims in the wider Tāmaki Makaurau region, which represents around a quarter of all remaining settlements in New Zealand.”

“Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei’s hospitality and graciousness allowed the creation and growth of New Zealand’s largest city and commercial centre, Auckland, but the tribe was left virtually landless in return. This settlement allows them to be re-establish their footprint on the isthmus.”

“Ngāti Manuhiri was left virtually landless through the Crown’s actions, which had devastating consequences for the cultural, spiritual, economic and physical well-being of Ngāti Manuhiri that continue to be felt today.”

The Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Bill will settle the historical Treaty of Waitangi claims of Ngāti Manuhiri. The claims of Ngāti Manuhiri relate to the loss of land and the actions of the Crown, covering the eastern coastline from Whangaparoa/Orewa to Mangawhai, including Hauturu/Little Barrier Island. Ngāti Manuhiri has around 1200 members. The settlement includes commercial and financial redress worth $9 million, as well as the return of six culturally significant sites including 1.2 hectares of land on Hauturu/Little Barrier Island.

The Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Settlement Bill will settle the historical Treaty of Waitangi claims of Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei. The settlement includes financial and commercial redress worth $18 million, which includes $2 million already received by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei as redress for the 1993 Railways settlement, and the return of the culturally significant site, Purewa Creek Conservation Area.

“This is a momentous day, and shows the continued momentum towards this government’s goal of resolving historical Treaty grievances with all iwi by negotiating in good faith as Treaty partners,” Mr Finlayson said. “This year alone the House has passed 11 pieces of Treaty legislation, meaning more iwi than ever before are able to enjoy the benefits of settlement.”

“The broad support for the passage of these bills demonstrates the importance of putting the injustices of the past behind us so all New Zealanders can move forward together,” Mr Finlayson said.
Copies of the deeds of settlement are available on the Office of Treaty Settlements’ website www.ots.govt.nz

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