Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


National’s Kyoto decision causing backlash at Doha

5 December 2012

National’s Kyoto decision causing backlash at Doha

The National Government’s decision to reject making meaningful commitments to reduce New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions has raised the risk of New Zealand being locked out of international carbon markets.

“New Zealand is being shamed on the international stage every day here in Doha and we can no longer hold our heads high for our approach on climate change,” said Green Party climate change spokesperson Kennedy Graham, who is at the United Nations international climate change talks.

The National Government last month announced New Zealand would not to sign up to a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, a global agreement with binding obligations to cut greenhouse gas emissions. The first commitment period stops at the end of the year. Australia, and 36 other countries, intend to sign up again.

“The National Government has gutted the Emissions Trading Scheme aimed at reducing emissions and has also failed to make binding commitments to achieve reductions,” Dr Graham said.

“There are serious concerns being raised by countries which are signing up to the second commitment period, that New Zealand is trying to free-load by accessing international carbon markets after refusing to accept the same legal obligations as Europeans and Australians.

“Official attendees at the conference are being diplomatic but many have made it clear that they find it a bit rich for New Zealand to fail to pull its weight by signing up to binding reductions but wanting to retain all the benefits.

“The National Ministers here will be pushing to change the Kyoto rules so New Zealand can have its cake and eat it. It seems that Climate Change Minister Tim Groser’s idea of New Zealand doing its fair share is for others to do the work and for New Zealand to reap the benefit.

“Wouldn’t it be ironic if New Zealand is shut out of the international carbon trading systems which would see the price of carbon here soar? The National Government could, by accident, actually restore some of the point to the ETS.

“However, if the price of carbon were to increase, I’m sure that this National Government will be on hand to immediately change the law so polluters don’t have to pay. That cost would again be loaded on the taxpayer.

“New Zealand has now received five fossil awards for our climate failures, while the most senior UN Nations climate change figure, Christiana Figueres, has described New Zealand’s position on Kyoto as very disappointing.

“The National Government downplays its decision not to make Kyoto commitments but that decision has dismayed some who once saw New Zealand as an ally in the fight to combat climate change,” Dr Graham said.

“To quote one source here at Doha yesterday: ‘New Zealand will need to make a choice – is it serious about climate change, or does it wish to be singled out as an obstacle to progress?’

“It seems the National Government has already made its choice,” Dr Graham said.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Open Source // Open Society - Full Coverage

Gordon Campbell:
On The Reserve Bank And Auckland Housing

The ‘crisis – what crisis?’ response by the government to the Auckland housing price bubble is no longer acceptable.

So says Reserve Bank governor Grant Spencer – who used unusually frank language in his speech and subsequent interviews yesterday to call for a capital gains tax, and to generally chastise central and local government for their inaction on a threat to the country’s economic health and financial stability.

That threat has been real for some time. The housing price bubble has already created a currency bubble... Undaunted, the government keeps calling this situation a success story. More>>

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Bangladesh: GCSB Dragging NZ Into Human Rights Abuses

The New Zealand government should stop providing intelligence assistance to Bangladeshi security agencies that are known to systematically engage in human rights abuses, said the Green Party today. More>>

ALSO:

Troops Heading To Iraq: Government Must Come Clean On Deployment

New Zealanders deserve more than to hear about their troops’ deployment overseas from Australian media, Opposition Leader Andrew Little says. “News from Australia that Kiwi troops are on their way to Iraq this week is another example of the culture of secrecy and unknown protections around the deployment.” More>>

ALSO:

Image: Strikers And Protestors Join Outside McDonald's

A group of protestors took to McDonald’s Manners St today as a part of the international fast food workers day of action to end zero hour contracts. More>>

ALSO:

Greens: Special Education Funds Not Spent

More than $32 million of funding for children with special needs has not been spent by the Government, despite families of children with special needs complaining for years that they’ve been denied the support they deserve. More>>

ALSO:

John Key: Pre-Budget Speech To Business NZ

So this Government will remain relentlessly focused on improving the competitiveness of our economy... We will continue to give businesses a platform to invest, grow and create jobs in the knowledge they will be backed by a clear and consistent government policy programme. More>>

ALSO:

Multimedia: Andrew Little’s Response To John Key’s Pre-Budget Address

Labour Party leader Andrew Little spoke today on John Key’s pre-budget address this afternoon in Wellington. Little said National has had seven years to achieve a surplus and Kiwis have “fufilled their end of the bargain.” More>>

Surplus Baggage: Key Backs Off ‘Artificial Target’

John Key’s attempt to redefine his cornerstone promise of two election campaigns as an artificial target suggests his other promises are works of fiction, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On UE Pass Rates And University Dropout Rates

Houston, there is clearly a problem with (a) the plunge in pass rates for University Entrance qualifications, which has been especially steep among Maori students and also a problem with (b) the failure rates for Maori students among those who reach university... Unfortunately the two problems seem related. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
More RSS  RSS
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news